Questions

How to get my name out there?

Hi have just started a removalist business things have started out well but want to try get the... read more

Brad Lyons
Brad LyonsOwner at SMS Fusion
1. Build your website and ensure you have the keywords you are after throughout the site. 2. Pay for Google adsense. Set a budget and the keywords. 3. Setup Google Analytics for the website so you can track views, locations and start collecting the stats. 4. Buy the domain names for the most common keywords used to find your site. 5. Add your business to Google maps6. Do some smart research and marketing. I did a similar campaign for a company that wanted to reach out to everyone that was about to move. Called and offered utilities for their new address. 7. Know your customers. Ensure you have a good CRM to keep track of your customers. If you know your customers well enough, you will know when they are due to move next.Those are some basic points that should help get your name out there. After all that, you still need to make sure your customer service is above and beyond. People talk, and happy customers are willing to spread the word for you also.
Jef Lippiatt
Jef LippiattOwner at Startup Chucktown
Really great comments by John and Roland. I'm not sure I could add anything else they haven't already covered.
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Questions

How much would be our budget to advertise our webplatform?

  How much would be the budget to advertise our web-platform homez.design the site is marketplace... read more

Some sound advice here already Denis. The “How much” question you ask is being applied to an expense item ‘advertising, when it can only have any context when you first apply it to the revenue side or your business model. ‘How much’ will your enterprise need to generate as turnover and profit. Only when this has a quantified value can you define a reasonable and effective budget to achieve your projected return.There are dozens if services similar to your brief description popping up every month so it is a crowded market and effective differentiation is paramount if you are to heard above the increasing promotional noise.I have visited your website and whilst interesting looking the navigation is far too confusing for most casual browsers To extend your reach and appeal there is some platform restructuring I would recommend prior to considering any advertising expenditure.
Lucy Cook
Lucy CookSolopreneur at Lucy Cook
Hi Denis,The question you need to delve down first is: What is your main goal for advertising? Is it for Brand Awareness, Lead Generation for Opt-in Newsletters, Lead Conversion, etc.Once you have a finalized answer for that then you need to consider the platforms you'll use for advertisement, what is applicable for your target market - factors to consider would be the behavior of your ideal client's demographics- Where they are at? What time are they usually online or busy? Lastly, you'd need to start benchmarking, there is no definite amount for specific results yet, all you need to do is test first and see which ad creative or strategy works best for your product , then stick with it for some time as long as it is still performing.
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Questions

How much does advertising cost on Foxtel?

I've found out about pricing of advertising on Australian tv, but what about on Foxtel australia? read more

Steve Osborne
Steve OsborneOwner at Smarthinking
Call the Foxtel advertising department and ask them.
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Questions

Would you advertise in LinkedIn or is it purely sharing knowledge, relationship building, networking etc?

My ideal client would be found in LinkedIn. read more

Brian Mallyon
Brian MallyonOwner at Luckypole Limited
I use LI as a tool to locate potential people who I consider appropriate to network with and form business relationships with.For me, advertising on there doesn't do that, simply because I see it as a networking site rather one of "selling". As with Steven, I have never clicked.on an ad.Every new customer I have got from LinkedIn has been through contact, discussion, imparting knowledge etc. All things that consisted of personal time and effort, rather than placing an ad.And, although I am including my experiences only, I have found that the more time and effort the better the reward. As soon as I slacken off, so does any result, sometimes significantly.
Steven Freeman
Steven FreemanOwner at Evolved Sound
LinkedIn is getting to be a very noisy space. Can't say I have ever clicked on a paid ad within, so it may be worth finding some stats on conversion rates in your industry compared to others PPC advertising options.
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Questions

Is there a rule about using google images for flyer advertising?

Steve Osborne
Steve OsborneOwner at Smarthinking
Yes. The rule is: don't do it.If you do not own the image, it is not yours to use.See above answers for copyright-free alternatives.
Philip BrookesOwner at Aktiv Tactics
Images found via a Google search or any other method are all subject to the same copyright laws. Some people will distribute their images with a Creative Commons license, of specific usage rights. If it's clear that their license terms permit you to use the image for the purpose you intend, then go ahead (you may need, for example, to include an acknowledgement of the source of the image). In some cases you may just need to email the owner and request permission. But commercial images need to be purchased - this involves finding how they're distributed and paying the required license fee. You'll find a lot of images on the web come from stock image libraries like Shutterstock, iStockPhoto, Getty Images, Dreamstime, etc... There are quite a few low cost options, so there's really no need to risk using someone's images without permission.
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Questions

Has anyone used cinema advertising for their business?

Was it effective and what industry are you in? read more

Cinema advertising can be most effective for developing andmaintaining local awareness. If your business is easily accessible to individuals who attend the screen/s you advertise on. Cinema awareness campaigns are essentially a long game and continuity is therefore important. Most people won’t remember a single ad but will eventually become familiar with your brand and offer after multiple trips to the cinema. Prior to committing to a cinema campaign it is always worthwhile to visit the screen look at the patrons – are they really your target audience? Check out who is currently advertising and call them all to see if they will be renewing their subscription and what level/value of business they are able to associate with their cinema advertising.
Sputnik Sputnik
Sure. The choice of media usually depends on a few different factors and can be unique to each business.On the upside, you have a captive audience (assuming they arrive while the ads are on), they can't flick channels etc. It's also good for location based businesses that are nearby a cinema. (A meal afterwards etc) Or good for targeting certain groups of people who watch certain kinds of films if you are able to do that.On the downside, people aren't usually in buying mode right before a film and have likely forgotten about your ad 2 hours later when they walk out. Like pretty much ALL media and placement, it really depends on what your brand is and what you're trying to achieve.
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Questions

How can I sell my advertising airtime for Channel Nine Australia?

Hello  I currently hold $10,000 worth of advertising airtime for Channel Nine Australia - running... read more

Steven Freeman
Steven FreemanOwner at Evolved Sound
There are companies like Emitch Pty Ltd that broker undersold / spare advertising air time. The trade off is you may not be able to offload for the same retail rate that you originally paid for it.
Charlene Walker
hiI have a couple of clinets who maybe interested. Can you let me know the detailsrun time of adtime ads are runninghow many and for how longany other details
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Questions

Does anyone have suggestions for advertising in Ipswich?

Hi, I have recently relocated from the Sunshine Coast to Ipswich. I am a Telecommunications... read more

Asked by:
David Bobis
David BobisOwner at Studio Culture
Hi Peter,First off congratulations on the move! One thing I would suggest is to start implementing SEO into your website, so more people can find you when they google services related to your business. Then I would look into Facebook advertising, which can be much cheaper and more effective than traditional advertising. Feel free to PM me if you want to discuss any further! :)
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Questions

What have you discovered to be your No.1 way to drum up your business?

Jef Lippiatt
Jef LippiattOwner at Startup Chucktown
I would say get out can connect with professionals and business owners within your target industry. Look for ways to have meaning conversations with people and building rapport without trying to sell them something. This lets them know you are looking to make a genuine connection.Once you have made some connections leverage them. Show them your service or product (again without trying to sell them). Look for genuine feedback and criticism on ways you can improve your offering. If they think you are on to something, ask them to share it with others that may be interested. Even in this digital age, word of mouth marketing or advertising is the most powerful sales vehicle. As mentioned above, people buy from those they trust.Join several industry groups to stay on the pulse of what is going on within your industry as well as keeping tabs on potential talent and competition.This may seem far-fetched, but talk to competitors. If you speak with a competitor that is not in your current geographic area and you both are not looking to immediately expand into overlapping territory you'll be surprised at the amount of candid detail they are willing to share. Lastly, the most important way to drum up business is really simple, but not necessarily easy. Get to know your customers and stay in constant communication with them. Get their feedback and act on it rapidly. Show them they are valued and you'll get plenty of participation. Remember without customers, you have no business.
Jason UptonOwner at Resilient Digital
Connect with people on LinkedIn that are in the same niche you provide products and/or services to. Form a relationship with them, find out what problems they are having and deliver solutions specific to their needs. People don't buy from the most intelligent or skilled, they buy from those they trust.
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Advertising

What's Next in Mobile Advertising? 6 Trends for the New Year.

Mobile and online advertising is always changing, as technology is constantly updating and...read more

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3 Ways to Create Mobile Ads That Attract, Not Annoy, Customers

Mobile gives brands the opportunity to emotionally connect with consumers, and yet so many continue...read more

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Advertising

Yahoo7 announces commercial launch of Tumblr in Australia and New Zealand

David Karp, Tumblr's Founder and CEO, is in Sydney for the first time for the commercial launch of...read more

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Questions

Do you adjust your marketing and advertising efforts seasonally?

Do you adjust the feel, voice or imagery for your marketing and advertising efforts as seasons... read more

Asked by:
Jef Lippiatt
Jef Lippiatt Owner at Startup Chucktown
David Bobis
David BobisOwner at Studio Culture
We do a bit of both, depending on the goals of the client and changes in the market. With some clients we provide our SEO services with, for instance, we come up with an overarching plan that does consider seasonal changes (we look at the months search terms are popular, for example, and create content and inbound marketing strategies that are relevant accordingly). Sometimes, markets change, so we don't always stick to our seasonal plan.
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Questions

What is your take in regards to neuromarketing as an advertising technique?

Do you agree that brain science and marketing really works? Have you applied it? read more

Steve Osborne
Steve OsborneOwner at Smarthinking
My take is that neuromarketing is less an advertising technique than a market research measurement tool. Whether the science of studying brain patterns in response to marketing stimuli works or not is a moot point. You either interpret the measurements or you don't. Various measuring tools have been applied for decades and will continue to be applied for as long as anyone is interested in consumer behaviour and responses.
Jef Lippiatt
Jef LippiattOwner at Startup Chucktown
I may be incorrectly interpreting what you are asking, so please correct me if that is the case.I'm not certain about brain science and marketing, but cognitive psychology and marketing are powerful combinations. That is why many things are priced like this, $19.99 instead of $20. Monetarily there is almost no difference, especially when you factor in that after taxes it is going to be over $20 either way.Also, consumers fall into odd behavior patterns with things like coupons. If I have a retail store and I'm selling a sweater for $35 and no one is buying it, I can add a sale or coupon (in what can sometimes border on manipulation of varying degrees. What if I mark the sweater up to $42 but it's now 20% off (well logically that put the price at $33.60 less than $2 off the original $35 price) but people think they are getting an outrageous deal.I think online retail is harder to up the experience (at least in terms of physical presence). If I have a physical store, I can change the signage, lightening or even the scent in the store to try to help create an inviting environment. However, online that isn't really an option (but many online stores vary their pricing throughout the day, or offer coupon codes to only specific geographic areas).I think it is possible to use, cognitive psychology to affect the outcomes of both brick and mortar and online stores. I would like to believe it is being used to benefit the consumer, but most of the time that isn't true.I do apply cognitive psychology in my designs, but in less ominous ways. The branding (colors, fonts, layout) all can impact the mood of the user. Trying to create an experience that a demographic of users would enjoy and appreciate is always a good thing. I do occasionally test out different calls to action or imagery, but often ask for feedback from users and peers.I believe that consumers appreciate a company that has a valuable product or service, is transparent about how they are operate, and that they value their customers. Online resources have made comparing you against your competition very easy, and if they were only for a better deal, they can easily jump to one. All it takes to lose a customer is one bad experience (but that is the same for your competition). Focus on delivering great products, with great customer service and be wiling to adapt based on your customer needs rather than business goals (after all without your customers you wouldn't be in business).People don't like feeling tricked by a company (I know I sure don't). So if you wouldn't be your own customer (if you didn't work there) chances are you need to make some adjustments.
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Questions

What is the best step to approach prospective clients, other than advertising online or sending out brochures?

Iain DooleyOwner at The Procedure People
Hey Leah, The first step is to narrow down who your prospective clients are. And "small business" doesn't cut it ;) For example, in my software business, I'm interested in small service businesses that have between 2 and 10 staff and more than $2 mil in annual revenue, or professional consultants who generate in excess of $300k/year but have no staff. In order to target these people I have setup a new brand called The Procedure People http://www.theprocedurepeople.com/ -- my goal is to identify business owners who have solved their sales problem but are having trouble growing due to lack of infrastructure. When I did some keyword research in Google AdWords, I found people looking for help with "policies & procedures", my hypothesis is that those people are exactly the target market I'm after (or at least a portion of them are). But without first stating very clearly who my ideal client is, I wouldn't have been able to come up with a creative way to get access to them. You're running a PA service: who is your ideal customer? Do you want to access solopreneurs (eg. on Flying Solo) or do you want to access professional consultants? What about picking an industry? Can you be particularly helpful to anaesthetists? Accountants? Lawyers? GPs? Anyway, you get the point: the answer to the question "how should I get in touch with my prospective clients" will depend on who those prospective clients are. Identifying who they are is often more challenging, than trying to find them ;)
Phil Joel
Phil JoelDirector at SavvySME
Hi Leah,You can also try networking - both online and offline. Join groups that your target clients are in. Go to local events - basically wherever your clients are likely to go. It takes time and effort but it does work.
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Questions

How many of you are using video as part of your marketing strategy?

I am really curious to know the answer to this one. How many business owners out there are using... read more

Asked by:
Peter Jones
Peter JonesFounder at LinkSmart
Hi, I have been helping a client recently with video who is just starting out. We were able to cost save by going to fiverr.com and had a lady from Queensland do a really good intro video for the website $45.00 with extras. Then we just did home video showing that the owner of the business as  an 'expert' in his products, uploaded to YouTube. Total cost just some time editing the videos. Worked really well for us and our clients. We even used Qr codes to play the videos attached to the products. Good luck Peter
I've just started with a few clients. Things that held me / us back: 1. perception that video is complicated, time-consuming and expensive. 2. lack of knowledge about how to do it. 3. lack of bandwidth. I went to an absolutely brilliant seminar just before Christmas which looked at video in all its aspects (Stuart Gordon, are you out there?!?) and came away all inspired with: 1. list of options as to where we could use video effectively (start with client testimonials) 2. reinforcement of the knowledge that content is more important than the technology (eg if you interview a client on an iPhone it really doesn't matter that it looks like a home video, it simply makes it more 'real'- unless you are a video provider, of course!) 3. confidence that we could upload to YouTube then embed in our sites without having random YouTube who knows what showing up after OUR video played. Starting gently but really think this is a great way to go!  
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Advertising

5 Companies That Transformed Advertising In 2013

The convergence of social, video and mobile technology is rapidly changing the face of advertising....read more

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In-Image Advertising: How To Monetize The Visual Web

It’s fair to ask if the Internet finally catches up with certain technologies. Some things...read more

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5 Ways to Make Your Coupons Stand Out From the Pack

People still love coupons, but these days it's increasingly hard to stand out with your offer. Here...read more

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Questions

Are you interested in pitching advertising / design / marketing concepts for a range of clients?

I'm working on a business model based on involving a group of talented creatives in a... read more

Asked by:
Steve Osborne
Steve Osborne
Steve OsborneOwner at Smarthinking
Thanks to all who've posted comments so far. Here's a bit more detail on how this might work. The model is intended to attract concepts only, not execution ie. production would not be included in your submission. This is not a 99Designs model. There are two levels of involvement – open briefs and closed briefs. Open (or public) briefs are accessible by all and any group member can respond. Payment would vary depending on the brief and the client. Closed briefs are by invitation only. Only those who have proven themselves on public briefs are eligible. Everyone working on a closed brief would be paid for their contribution.  The entire model is managed by a team of experienced marketing heads. So the briefs would be well-written. This team makes the final decision as to which responses are shown to the client, so yes, you would be competing against other members within the co-operative on open briefs. However, the responses are selected on the simple basis of "best idea wins." The management team controls client communication and production. A submission would have 3 x mandatory and one optional component. 1. a strong, memorable, two sentence headline or title that clearly conveys the idea. 2. a concise, one paragraph description covering the Who, What, When, Where of the idea. 3. the How ie. an insight into how the concept would be realised. This might include suggestions for production. 4. (optional) some sort of reference image, sketch, drawing, storyboard – whatever you felt might aid the idea. The model does not preclude you from working with a partner(s), or from submitting multiple responses. The model is intended to induce the best ideas with the least amount of physical labour. The idea started because we all have a massive file of rejected, unsuited or self-censored concepts. Either the client didn't appreciate their beauty/profundity/cleverness, or didn't have the budget! Whatever the reason, they they never saw the light of presentation. We wondered, what if there was a way to get some of those brilliant, but unused, ideas into the hands of businesses that needed them? Without necessarily revealing where they came from/who did them. Clients get to go outside their formal agency setups and draw from a larger pool of top talent (some of whom might want to stay anonymous because of conflict of interest issues).  So the co-operative idea was born.
Neil Steggall
Neil SteggallPartner at Wardour Capital Partners
For me it comes down to teamwork and the emerging trend to outsource. If the concept is well managed the outcome for the client (and this is what we should be focusing on) has to be better.
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