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Cloud computing

What Cloud Computing Tools Can Do for Your Business -- with Examples

The Cloud Cloud computing is making your data, files and even your software accessible securely... read more

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Jef LippiattCo-founder at Startup Chucktown
Macartan, I by no means was trying to talk down about the services or what you provide. I just wanted those additional points for context. I believe every person/business needs to use whatever system works for them. I looked into Xero myself, but I decided to start out with Wave (not sure it is available there or not).
Macartan GaughanOwner at Knightstone Partners
Very valid points Jef, the accessibility and security of the data is very important and each providers terms and conditions need to be considered before you commit. As regards a doomsday situation where the service goes down or out of business, localised copies of the files either in soft or hard copy are recommended of course - these form back of your back up strategies. However, that does not deflect from the stated benefits. In our firm, for example, we use Xero, QBO and MYOB for accounting files for our clients to mitigate the risk of relying on only one and we hold offline copies of final accounts for each client. While, I am a very strong enthusiast for these services because of the systematic improvements they are bringing, there are always risks of course. However, they are very similar to those that exist in pretty much all computer software in general, cloud, desktop or otherwise - Rather than using them as an excuse not to explore these new exciting services I prefer the approach where clients mitigate the risk so that they can enjoy the benefits!
Cloud computing

Is Accounting Sexy Yet..? (No - but Xero is Trying…)

Walking into Xero’s slick Melbourne office in Richmond conjures up images of what 1 Infinite Loop,... read more

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Jef LippiattCo-founder at Startup Chucktown
I agree when the person/business has plenty of options to choose from everyone benefits. I think once there are too many options available professionals can step in and guide them to the proper platform(s) based on their needs.
Macartan GaughanOwner at Knightstone Partners
Thankfully, there are a good few more players joining the party in the cloud accounting field in Australia with ReckonOne and SageOne launching recently. I'm all for competition! However, having become a certified advisor for Xero, QBO and ReckonOne, I have to say that Xero is still the best in class, with QBO behind them and ReckonOne no where near competing yet. I gave Wave a look just now, I am looking forward to them entering Australia properly.
Cloud computing

3 Reasons Why MYOB is Not a Cloud Accounting Firm....Yet

Allow me to tell you a story of the first and last time I explored MYOB’s “online” accounting... read more

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Macartan GaughanOwner at Knightstone Partners
MYOB's recent IPO has presumably given them a war chest of funds that they will hopefully use to improve their services, but I fear that their entitled attitude is too engrained in the company. It is up to MYOB to show that they care and that begins with customer service and experience. If they don't accountants and their firms will continue to leave their service in droves!
Michael PriorPrincipal at PB Advisory Group
Macartan, like you I just cant understand why MYOB just don't get it! As you have said both Xero and QuickBooks Online support leaves MYOB for dead. Earlier this year I went to the MYOB Roadshow and was flabbergasted that they were promoting an enhancement as leading edge when both Xero and QuickBooks had been doing the same for years and with better functionality.
Cloud computing

What to Look for When Choosing Cloud Computing Services

Cloud this and cloud that. Private Cloud, Public Cloud, Virtual Servers so on and so forth – it is... read more

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Per Henriksen Director at CloudVikings
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Cloud computing

Forget the cloud, the future is in the 'fog'

I'm as big a believer in the transformational power of cloud computing as anyone you'll meet....read more

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Cloud computing

Risk considerations - cloud or in-house

There are a number of issues to consider when deciding on which cloud provider to use or whether... read more

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Cloud computing

Reasons for moving business to the cloud

Most owners of small businesses limit the scope of accounting to filing tax returns. Just think... read more

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Wendy HuangFull Time Blogger and YouTuber at A Custom Blog in 4 Minutes
Great article Thivaharan!
Cloud computing

Reasons for moving accounting to the cloud

Most businesses limit the scope of accounting to filing tax returns. Just think of it. What good... read more

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Ling LeeDirector at Japanese Sword Auctions Australia
Does cloud accounting have a management accounting function?
Cloud computing

I am often asked -private cloud, public cloud or the old Inhouse server room? here is my take.

Technology doesn’t generate revenue for most companies. Business processes powered by technology... read more

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Wendy HuangFull Time Blogger and YouTuber at A Custom Blog in 4 Minutes
Thanks for your take Andrew! I'm also very partial to cloud :D
Cloud computing

Cloud as a disruptive technology: put your buck in the right place

Every now and then we see a technology that sweeps the market off its feet while rendering the... read more

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Yes It does allow for printing Ling Lee.
Neil SteggallPartner at Wardour Capital Partners
a great article Thivaharan!
Cloud computing

A walk through the window and into the cloud (For the SMEs)

A walk through the Window and into The Cloud (For the SMEs) The IT industry seems to relish the... read more

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Cloud computing

Thinking Cloud? Prepare by Answering 5 Simple Questions

Growing and mid-sized businesses across industries are increasingly tuning into cloud... read more

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Bennett Oprysa CEO at BitCloud
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Phil JoelDirector at SavvySME
Thank you for sharing this Bennett. I would also add Security and Integration as other key considerations - that is how your various business applications can integrate with each other once some or all of them are in the cloud.
John BelchamberOwner & Senior Consultant at Invoke Results
Great tips, thank you Bennet.
Cloud computing

Is Your Business Ready For The Cloud?

Cloud has been a buzzword for quite a while now, following the footsteps of similar words like... read more

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Wendy Huang Full Time Blogger and YouTuber at A Custom Blog in 4 Minutes
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0202020 0303030Owner at Body Kneads
just wondering why... "WHY" would you follow MEEEE?
Ling LeeDirector at Japanese Sword Auctions Australia
Wow, sounds like a great idea! Very excited for this!
Cloud computing

Benefits of cloud-based disaster recovery

An effective business disaster recovery plan is like building or travel insurance - you don't...read more

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Cloud computing

The risky business of the cloud

Cloud computing has been one of the game changers of business IT, however no change comes without...read more

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Questions

What are the best options for hosting data files?

I replied to a question on site a while ago that my business holds all of our data files in the... read more

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Rhys Roberts Director at Viridity
Rhys RobertsDirector at Viridity
Thanks James & Dave, just what I was looking for.  A couple of follow up comments. Budget is probably less important that the functionality (within reason of course), and there do seem to be a range of options all of which will cost significantly less than a locally installed server.  To date we have been using both Dropbox & Boxnet, both for storing internal documents and for file transfer to / from clients (with access restricted by user of course).  One of the downsides of Dropbox is the lack of granularity of access control - you either grant a user access to a folder or not.  Boxnet offers better control than this - users can be given read only / upload only / download only / edit but not delete / and a number of other variations of access.  An issue I have with both Dropbox & Boxnet is that users can set up to automatically sync to their local workstation, which is great in terms of speed of opening files and also overcomes concerns of internet access (although as we have primary and backup access I don't see this is a likely risk).  A problem this creates is in terms of conflicted files - user A opens a file from their local machine, Dropbox syncs this.  User B then opens the same file from their local machine and Dropbox creates a "conflicted copy" - you now have 2 different versions of the same file.  We manage this internally at the moment via procedures, but that is becoming steadily more challenging. As my business grows I am keen to ensure that the solutions we use are appropriate for the size of the business.  Thanks for the input above, I will continue to explore this issue & will at some stage implement some amendments to our current set up.  Cheers, Rhys        
I'm a big fan of Google. We use Google for business so get to use our own domain names for our emails and Google docs is an excellent platform for file storage of all kinds. Google for business is only US$50 per email so very affordable for small business. We tend to use Google docs for internal business documents like policies and procedures and our office network layouts. We use Dropbox for file sharing outside of the business.
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Cloud computing

Do you need a 'cloud' makeover?

As a virtual assistant I could not operate without the cloud. However at a recent local networking... read more

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Michaela Clark Virtual Assistant at mi virtual pa
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Phil KhorFounder at SavvySME
Hey Michaela, good article. I agree cloud technology is somewhat essential these days for small businesses, so it pays to understand what it is, and how it can help streamline and save costs. Thanks.
Wendy HuangFull Time Blogger and YouTuber at A Custom Blog in 4 Minutes
I totally agree with you Michaela!! After going on cloud there's not going back :)!! I love google apps and have started using their spreadsheets more then excel (of course my spreadsheets are quite simple so it works). Great tips! Would love to see a list of your top 5 cloud apps you use for your business :D?
Questions

What is the best way to back up my Google docs?

Hi Savvy's, Yesterday I found that one of my Google docs had somehow lost some updates I made a... read more

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Phil Joel Director at SavvySME
Per HenriksenDirector at CloudVikings
Sorry for my late entry here, but there is an excellent Cloud-2-Cloud backup product for Google Apps called Backupify (www.backupify.com). It backs up all your files on Google Drive, Emails, Contacts, Calendars and Sites.
Ben ThompsonCEO at Employment Innovations (EI)
That looks useful, you can also install Google drive onto your computer and set the sync settings to manual. This will allow you to back up your docs.
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Cloud computing

Benefits of Clouds Computing

Twenty-five years ago accounting software for businesses was hosted on an... read more

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Questions

What would stop you from moving into the cloud for all your IT requirements?

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Andrew EganOwner at Adept IT
I think a crucial show-stopper for several of my clients is the internet speed to their present location. I've got two clients in particular who aren't able to achieve any more than 2M/sec downstream - it's hard enough for them to just browse the internet in an office of 8 people, let alone conduct all their business across it. It's also not cost effective for them to move to a more appropriate solution such as SDSL or Ethernet - in both cases I've done SQ anyway to find that they'd be paying huge amounts of money but not really able to acheive much better speed.  
Minh DoSolution Architect at Anchor Systems
The "cloud' is a very loosely defined term that basically means a cluster of computers somewhere located in an external location. It isn't a new concept, and in fact hosted services have been operating similar offerings for the last 10 years. What *is* relatively new however, is the gradual move to have the majority of in-house systems hosted in the "cloud" for a number of perceived or actual benefits.  The first major barrier would be the specialised knowledge required to reliability and competently host such a core aspect of a company. You need to be confident in the vendors ability to handle: 1) The traffic from users 2) Provide support in the event of an issue 3) Have spares/hot swap chassis/redundancies in place, above and beyond what can be installed "in-house" to justify the outsourcing to the "cloud". Apart from this, the other major barrier that I see is the inability to account for data location - that is, in a "true" cloud solution like AWS you cannot be sure across how many physical servers your vital information is duplicated. This is major problem for companies which have APRA (financial) reporting requirements or for companies which are required by PCI-DSS or ISO27001 (best practices) to have information stored in distinctly separated physical servers.
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