Managing employees

How your staff can increase your brand's digital visibility

Your staff is one of your biggest untapped resources. Most staff have some digital footprint or... read more

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Jef LippiattOwner at Startup Chucktown
Although I mostly agree, I think caution needs to be taken. I've worked at places previously that "very strongly recommended" that you like their Facebook page or share the company updates on your own social media. The problem is, that creates disdain within employees. It is essentially being forced to share with something that you might not agree with or like (and it seems like you are personally endorsing it - since you work there and share it). People were seriously dinged on their "performance reviews" for lack of participation. That is not okay. So with that in mind, a roll out must be done correctly and presented as optional with no ill impacts on your actual job performance.
Managing employees

4 Ways Employee Incentives Can Drive Engagement and Retention

Do you incorporate employee incentives into your business? Here are 4 ways you can create better...read more

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Managing employees

7 Excellent Reasons to Focus on Employee Engagement

Is your business engaging with its employees? There are lots of good reasons why you should be,...read more

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Questions

What steps do I have to take to dismiss an employee?

I have an employee who is consistently tardy, talks negatively about my business to the other staff... read more

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Meal Five at Meal5
General rules of procedural fairnessGeneral rules of procedural fairnessAn employer is generally required to perform the following steps to ensure that a dismissal is procedurally fair. These will apply whether it is a summary dismissal or a dismissal after warnings. You must carry out a full investigation into the alleged behaviour.The employee should be informed about the exact nature of the allegations and, where appropriate, that dismissal is a possible outcome of the disciplinary process.The employee should be given an opportunity to be heard.The employee should be given the option of having a support person or lawyer present when the hearing takes place.Unless the conduct in question justifies summary dismissal, the employee must be warned and asked to stop the misconduct or improve the poor performance. In appropriate cases, the employee should be given assistance in this. An accepted procedure is to first given an oral warning, then a formal written warning, then a final written warning.The employee should be given the reasons for the decision that you eventually reach. It is advisable that these be given before any dismissal. However, the employee has the right, within 60 days after the dismissal or after becoming aware of it, to request you to provide a written statement of the reasons; you must then provide the statement within 14 days.A dismissal should be notified in writing.An employee can be suspended on full pay pending the outcome of the disciplinary process.
We have used this company and recommended them to our small businesss clients where appropriate to make sure all your ducks line up and nothing comes back to bite you.http://employsure.com.au/
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Questions

How do you prefer to get feedback and/or recognition?

We are all different. But I'd like some different perspectives into what makes us all feel... read more

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Jef Lippiatt Owner at Startup Chucktown
Greg RogersFounder and CEO at REthink HQ
Hi Jef,I see that your a regular contributor to the site, I would like to acknowledge that. Without regular contributors like you the whole concept kinda doesnt work as well!Is that reinforcing for you? If it is the likelihood of you increasing the behaviour that is being reinforced is higher.If it's not then the likelihood is that the behaviour will decrease.Fairly simplistic answers to an area of Science as complex as us, individuals and humans!My answer is certainly not meant to be blase or condescending in anyway, the Science of Human Behaviour is a fascinating subject.Your question is actually the best answer, you need to ask the individual cos it's different strokes for different folks. The father of Human Behaviour, BK Skinner, will tell you that the biggest variables around the concept of human behaviour are actually the environment and timing.Telling the wife/girlfriend/partner/mistress that she looks hot in that dress...the next morning...just aint as reinforcing as when she steps into the doorway! Guaranteed. That's about the effectiveness of timing on behaviour. The more immediate the reinforcement, the greater influence on behaviour.Telling the wife/girlfriend/partner/mistress that she looks hot in that dress....in front of her work colleagues....as opposed to the privacy of your own home...is going to elicit a completely different response. Guaranteed. That's about the effectiveness of the environment on behaviour. The environment alone can influence or change behaviour.I enjoyed responding to this, I feel reinforced and rewarded.CheersGreg
Sarah IrwinSME Community Director at SavvySME
I like continued feedback on a job well done. I like knowing regularly that I'm meeting expectations. I think whenever I have gone above and beyond a public acknowledgement was valued. As little as a CC'd email can mean so much.I can think of one situation where my hard work was recognised as the hard work of my manager. It's the mark of a good leader where your team is exceeding expectations and their achievements are celebrated. Recognising your employees is a reflection of your own achievement as a leader and mentor. Taking the credit will never make your employees want to ever exceed expectations again.
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Questions

What is the most effective training for the development for your employees?

I sincerely believe in maximizing my employees' potential. What's the most effective training for... read more

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Managing employees

Boss V Buddy

Too often in business when a frontline person steps up to a leadership role there is no guidance on... read more

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Michelle Pascoe at Michelle Pascoe
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Jef LippiattOwner at Startup Chucktown
I do think that leaders need to live out the values they are saying the value and want the rest of the rest of the team to follow. The "do as I say, not as I do" mentality doesn't work. The other thing is transparency. As a leader you need to known failures. Stay humble and let the team know you will do better, don't just say it. Put your learning into action. Above all, remain teachable.
Managing employees

Alcohol, Drugs and Safety at Work

October is Safe Work Month - talk about the impact of alcohol and drugs in your workplace. We’ve... read more

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Managing employees

Business Leadership: 10 Tips For When You First Get Staff

After setting up your business, there will come a time when you’ll need to hire staff to help you... read more

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Ashley Bryan Owner at Webstrategies Pty Ltd.
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Jef LippiattOwner at Startup Chucktown
Definitely a bunch of great insightful nuggets in that article. Another thing I always think about is remembering to value your employees and customers because without them you aren't much of a business (if you are still one at all). I think many people forget this as they scale their business.
Questions

What are some strategies to improve employee retention?

Jef LippiattOwner at Startup Chucktown
This question covers a lot of ground, but I'll try to give you a few concrete ideas.Genuinely thank people for their effort - don't make this a robotic process. You don't need to thank everyone every time they do their job (that's their job after all). However, when someone makes a great effort (regardless of if it works out) recognize their effort and work. When someone does something great acknowledge it (to them individually or at a team or company level - but make sure they are comfortable with public recognition before you blurt it out to everyone - so people aren't a fan of public recognition).Give people a bit of margin during the workday / work week - Perhaps its a percentage of time (like Google's 20%) or several hours a week. Give them this room to read industry related articles, take online courses to further their learning or just the time and resources to work on a personal project that fosters learning and can maybe have strategic advantages for the company down the road.Don't make failure a threat - people that take risks can definitely help keep your business going forward (I'm not speaking of anything illegal or anything that would make the company look bad). If you can teach people to learn from mistakes and failure and turn that into a better solution or process going forward, that is still a win. Treat it as such. If failure is penalized, people will only do the bare minimum and that won't be good for your business in the long run.Get to know individuals & what motivates them - First you need to know your people to create a good relationship. Second you need to understand what motivates them. This helps when it is time to give an award. They may want a monetary bonus. Perhaps they'd be happier with an extra day or two of vacation. Maybe they are just looking to make a leap from a regular position into management. Get to know everyone and reward them with what motivates them individually.
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Managing employees

6 Tips for Better Communication

Engaging and developing close relationships with your employees is pretty straightforward when... read more

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Jef LippiattOwner at Startup Chucktown
I found the second half of #2 "Recognise" to be very interesting. Thanks for sharing.
Questions

HOW do you go about finding and choosing a VA?

given that I don't have abundant time to keep trying people until I find someone that clicks? (I'm... read more

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Questions

Would you rather lose a client or lose a staff member?

Or in other words, keep a client and lose a staff member or keep the staff member and lose a... read more

Much prefer to loose a client! I only keep employees if they are awesome.
Jef LippiattOwner at Startup Chucktown
Gary,I would somewhat echo what Huy wrote. I would most likely want to keep all of my staff, unless someone was causing problems for the overall team or not meeting expectations. If you've done your due diligence when hiring, it'd probably be hard to let someone go.However, from a client perspective I would examine a few more items. If the client is always difficult to work with, it would be an easy decision to stop working with them. I think the main concern before losing a client would be to consider, how much of your business will be impacted by not having their business? If cutting a client loose (even a difficult one) would impact your business to the point of closing your business you need to do some hard looking. Build up some additional clientele before cutting the client off. I would take that approach to ensure that if I lose a client, my staff would still have jobs.
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Questions

I reckon half the people that visited my stall at the recent festival. Is that a thing that people do?

I attended have cold-called me to offer their services. Because it is very off-putting. read more

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Have you ever been in a position where you're dealing with a rude person in your business? How did you deal with it?

I can never work with rude people, team members or clients. read more

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Questions

Can you elect to NOT hire someone based on what you find?

Such as violent crime or assault based offences, as you may have a fear for the safety of your... read more

Andre SmithMarketing
Not sure what the law says about your particular case, but when I am hiring I am not looking just for the best person for the job. Nope. I look at everything I think might influence my future employee. So if you fear for your own, and safety of your employees you can elect not to hire.
Steven FreemanOwner at Evolved Sound
Can you elect to do that providing it's not discriminatory or doesn't contravene other laws.
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Questions

If you could tell your customers just one thing about your business, what would it be?

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Managing employees

5 Reasons I'll Never Work In An Office Again

Flexible hours for employees are becoming increasingly popular, and the statistics should be very...read more

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Managing employees

The 5 Biggest Teamwork Problems

Ideally all businesses run smoothly without friction. In reality though even small businesses of a...read more

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Managing employees

What are workplace policies and why do I need them?

Workplace policies give guidance to your employees about what you expect of them and can also state... read more

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Lina BarfootEditor at SavvySME
That's a good point Jef, that it is always a good idea for policies to be as straight forward and easy to understand as possible.
Jef LippiattOwner at Startup Chucktown
I believe that policies help both parties (company & employee). I do believe that they should be concise and in easy to understand terminology. This helps everyone have a common understanding (not just I've read it but am still confused). Also, I would say unless absolutely necessary don't a policy. Making a policy for every small detail goes from creating professional guidelines and workplaces to a confusing and spirit crushing burden for employees.