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Media production

Wake Up News Corp: Digital Packaging Lessons to Learn

What's the latest in digital packaging? How are companies monetising digital content via... read more

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Tim Allison Board Member at Omake Interactive Services Pty Ltd
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Online marketing

Online Marketing for 'Multi-Passionate' Entrepreneurs

photo credit: YIP Day 151 - Kitchen Shelf via photopin (license)Often, I get the question, "I do so...read more

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Added via Small Business news and blog articles from The Huffington Post
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Questions

What kind of events would you want SavvySME to host?

Networking - meet and greet? Informational? Debates? Guest speakers? read more

Asked by:
Yee Trinh Co-founder at SavvySME
Lisa OrmenyessyBusiness Coach and Marketing Specialist at Straight Talk Group
Yee, I like what everyone else has said. I would like to contribute another line of thought borne out of a recent experience.Last week I went to an entrepreneurs meetup. There were 12 of us that met for a meal at a local cafe. I found this a really stimulating environment in that I got to connect with the four people I was seated next to on a much deeper level than I normally would have at a meet and greet. It felt way more relaxed and authentic.More food for thought. pun intended ;-)
Steve OsborneOwner at Smarthinking
In person informational topics presented by guest speakers followed by facilitated networking, appeals to me. As does the idea of a debate, provided there is strict administration and oversight. Very easy to degenerate into an online personality clash!
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Copywriting, content writing and blogging

How to Build a Custom Wordpress Blog or Website in Just 4 Minutes

Blogs have become an essential part of business. I was on the phone the other day with a client of... read more

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Wendy Huang Full Time Blogger and YouTuber at A Custom Blog in 4 Minutes
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Branding

It's Time To Get Real: Humanize Your Brand

These days, brands are doing everything they can to position products and services. This includes...read more

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Added via Small Business news and blog articles from The Huffington Post
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Questions

What is your take in regards to neuromarketing as an advertising technique?

Do you agree that brain science and marketing really works? Have you applied it? read more

Asked by:
Charlene Sampilo Customer Service at SavvySME
Steve OsborneOwner at Smarthinking
My take is that neuromarketing is less an advertising technique than a market research measurement tool. Whether the science of studying brain patterns in response to marketing stimuli works or not is a moot point. You either interpret the measurements or you don't. Various measuring tools have been applied for decades and will continue to be applied for as long as anyone is interested in consumer behaviour and responses.
Jef LippiattCo-founder at Startup Chucktown
I may be incorrectly interpreting what you are asking, so please correct me if that is the case.I'm not certain about brain science and marketing, but cognitive psychology and marketing are powerful combinations. That is why many things are priced like this, $19.99 instead of $20. Monetarily there is almost no difference, especially when you factor in that after taxes it is going to be over $20 either way.Also, consumers fall into odd behavior patterns with things like coupons. If I have a retail store and I'm selling a sweater for $35 and no one is buying it, I can add a sale or coupon (in what can sometimes border on manipulation of varying degrees. What if I mark the sweater up to $42 but it's now 20% off (well logically that put the price at $33.60 less than $2 off the original $35 price) but people think they are getting an outrageous deal.I think online retail is harder to up the experience (at least in terms of physical presence). If I have a physical store, I can change the signage, lightening or even the scent in the store to try to help create an inviting environment. However, online that isn't really an option (but many online stores vary their pricing throughout the day, or offer coupon codes to only specific geographic areas).I think it is possible to use, cognitive psychology to affect the outcomes of both brick and mortar and online stores. I would like to believe it is being used to benefit the consumer, but most of the time that isn't true.I do apply cognitive psychology in my designs, but in less ominous ways. The branding (colors, fonts, layout) all can impact the mood of the user. Trying to create an experience that a demographic of users would enjoy and appreciate is always a good thing. I do occasionally test out different calls to action or imagery, but often ask for feedback from users and peers.I believe that consumers appreciate a company that has a valuable product or service, is transparent about how they are operate, and that they value their customers. Online resources have made comparing you against your competition very easy, and if they were only for a better deal, they can easily jump to one. All it takes to lose a customer is one bad experience (but that is the same for your competition). Focus on delivering great products, with great customer service and be wiling to adapt based on your customer needs rather than business goals (after all without your customers you wouldn't be in business).People don't like feeling tricked by a company (I know I sure don't). So if you wouldn't be your own customer (if you didn't work there) chances are you need to make some adjustments.
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Offline and direct marketing

Pillar Promotion: When it's OK to Spread Yourself Out

When you undertake any kind of marketing activity or promotion, it makes sense to get the most... read more

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Lisa Ormenyessy Business Coach and Marketing Specialist at Straight Talk Group
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Branding

Is Your Consulting Firm Top of Mind?

Skip to main content SIGN IN | REGISTER Search form Search...read more

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Added via Social Media Today
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Questions

What are your favorite topics to cover for Forbes?

Are you limited to a specific scope in your writing with Forbes? How did you get your foot in the... read more

Asked by:
Jef Lippiatt Co-founder at Startup Chucktown
Jason Lim at Asia Recon
Hi Jef, In regards to scope with Forbes, it's fairly broad and flexible. Although I focus on the Asia region including Australia and technology, innovation, entrepreneurship and start-ups. All things I am interested in. Forbes basically approached me on Linkedin and asked me if I was interested to write. In China, I worked on a tech blog business where I lead the English content. My work has floated around various publications including The Washington Post, VentureBeat, Harvard Business Review, so I think they noticed my name. In terms of getting an outlet like Forbes to pick it up, I suggest really understanding the interest of the writer and pitch them on that angle. We get approached a lot by people wanting to publish stuff, especially PR people who are paid to do it. The story has to be compelling and fit the Forbes audience. Hope that helps!
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Questions

What would you recommend doing to grow an online deals community?

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Questions

How do I market bluetooth tracking devices for my small online business?

Hi Scott Yang, I have a small online business selling bluetooth tracking devices like... read more

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Rajeev Saini at Weerable
Scott YangFounder at OzBargain.com.au
Hi Rajeev,I am certainly no expert in marketing. However to sell something, you either have to (1) convince them that they need it, as it's a desirable item, or (2) it's so cheap and you might as well get it whether you need it or not.Unfortunately it's easier to do (2) on OzBargain than (1) because almost everyone looks at the price tag first. There might be some Special Interest Groups that you can go to, to share why your item is useful/desirable. On OzBargain it appears that the only way to sell is that it's cheaper than everyone else.
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Online marketing

10 Email Marketing Essentials: How To Get That Mail Opened

Your marketing strategy may include social media, traditional advertising, media exposure,... read more

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Simon Slade CEO at Doubledot Media
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Questions

What are the ramifications of using stock images to create a company logo?

Hi, if you hire a designer from overseas and they used stock images or just an image from the... read more

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Wendy Huang Full Time Blogger and YouTuber at A Custom Blog in 4 Minutes
Matt AntoninoOwner at High on SEO
When I started my own SEO agency a few years ago I actually knew exactly which "stock image" I wanted. I contacted the photographer directly and paid him a small sum to get the rights to use it as a logo outside of the stock agency. I used it for years, all was good, and no problems. So if you find something right for your business there are definitely ways!
Wendy HuangFull Time Blogger and YouTuber at A Custom Blog in 4 Minutes
Thanks for your answer :)!! It helps! I just feel when you hire a designer from oversea's this can be a huge issue that you unknowingly step into.
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Questions

What's your reputation worth?

I'm not talking about your social media clout here. I'm legitimately asking because it seems like... read more

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Jef Lippiatt Co-founder at Startup Chucktown
Steve OsborneOwner at Smarthinking
It's a good question Jef, but only raises others.Which companies or situations are you referring to? Is it the businesses or the people within them? What was the perceived standing of the business and what did it do to compromise its reputation? What did it gain in the short term and what was lost in the long term? It's difficult to address your question without context. A specific example or two would help.
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Questions

Is content syndication good idea, if it is then how to find best fit?

I am thinking of going with content syndication so that i can get more exposure for my articles but... read more

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Market research

Top 5 Qualitative Market Research Techniques

Qualitative market research is a powerful tool to plumb the depths of new territory and discover... read more

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Jef LippiattCo-founder at Startup Chucktown
I agree that focus groups have limitations, especially since it is questioning out of context. You may be asked if you'd buy something that costs hundreds of dollars (which without having to hand over at that time skews the context). Many of these areas overlap with User Experience Design, however, the focus or outcomes are used differently. One method I use is Contextual Inquiries which is very similar to in-depth interviews. The point is to see the user in their natural environment interacting with the product as they would if you weren't there with them. Another great method that is similar is the Master-Apprentice relationship. Let the user or customer know that they are the master and you are there to observe and learn from them. This sets up the stage to grow a bond of mutual trust.
Phil KhorFounder at SavvySME
Great article Alex! I guess it pays to use a combination of techniques but I often find 'observation research' you referred to as most useful. I suspect our human brain knows more subsconciously about what we like or don't, than words can ever describe. So I reckon it's more accurate to observe what people do, rather than what they say.
Online marketing

The Display Network - Targeting Explained

The display network on Google AdWords is something that many people leave well alone. Sure, it has... read more

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Questions

How do you come up with an original business name that is catchy, yet not outlandish?

It's hard finding a name that isn't taken already. read more

Asked by:
Yee Trinh Co-founder at SavvySME
Jef LippiattCo-founder at Startup Chucktown
I disagree somewhat with the simplicity approach. You must start with the company values before picking a name.Picking a simple name may not align or give flexibility to grow. Also most simple top level domain names are taken and are very costly to purchase. This can be problematic if you don't have significant funding.Names should be unique and memorable. Look at using parts of multiple words.For example a company we founded is called Ampersanity. It plays off the word 'ampersand' and 'sanity'. Ampersand came from "and per se and" when the & was the 27 letter of the alphabet after Z. So Ampersanity literally translates to And Sanity by itself. It matches our value slogan, "Chaos Creatively Managed".The point is that a back story and alignment to company values can be a stronger play than simplicity.
Lisa OrmenyessyBusiness Coach and Marketing Specialist at Straight Talk Group
Hi Yee, Most of the names we have created have come after a few wines! I don't know if there is a strict formula at all. I did read an article recently -the 2015 Marketing Trends report by Landor a global leader in brand consulting. They predict that Names will be going super simple... "With more noise in the digital market place and less time than eves to capture the consumers' attention, brands will continue to streamline the path to sales.That includes a shift back to basic, clear, relevant naming solutions. There will be universal, easy-to grasp concepts that consumers can instantly connect to (think Uber and Square) and that brands can fully own in meaning and URL."I hope this helps. If you need good quality wine... I can recommend something there too :)
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Online marketing

Give Custom Segments the Green Light in Google Analytics

As you probably know by now, I’m a bit of a fan of Google Analytics. It’s something I use on every... read more

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Online marketing

Question about Google Search: To Google or Not to Google Yourself

A common problem that comes up in the day to day running of many digital accounts is when clients... read more

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Ling LeeDirector at Japanese Sword Auctions Australia
I only search myself up to see how I'm faring on SEO :D
Yee TrinhCo-founder at SavvySME
Really informative article. Some great tips here that I hadn't known before. Thanks.