Web and interaction design

The leverage of ms access in business operations

Storing and managing huge amounts of data is quite tricky especially for an organization as huge... read more

Added by:
Rob Herr Marketing at Accede Holdings Pty Ltd
Please login or sign up to comment.
Be the first to comment
Web and interaction design

What Is Responsive Website Design – Simply Explained

There is no doubt that responsive design websites has been firmly established as the best way to... read more

Added by:
Please login or sign up to comment.
John BelchamberOwner & Senior Consultant at Invoke Results
Thanks Greg, I appreciate you taking the time to explain this to us both (and I suspect others).
Greg TomkinsOwner at Top Left Designs
Let me clear up one point for John firstly - Responsive websites are designed for mobile devices, first and foremost! The principal of a responsive design is that it will display your web page content within the viewing screen of your mobile device in such a way that you should not have to zoom and pan your screen in order to read or enter data. The responsive design includes code to detect the type of device being used which is how it manages display of content on the individual devices. If you are being told what you are suggesting John, I would recommend you talk to some new developers who know what they are doing and of course feel free to contact me as well if you wish. As for having a dedicated mobile site - there are instances where I would recommend this myself - particularly if you are simply wanting to add mobile capability to your web visitors to an existing site that is not mobile compatible. The other instance where a separate site is advantageous is where you want to present a much simplified - cut down version of your desktop site to visitors. The problem is that whilst the first part of responsive design is to shuffle the information elements around, if you have a site with vast amounts of content and each element is quite large (as say in white papers or long articles in your blogs or long pages) then of course reading these on an iPhone is just not going to happen. Now whilst yu can control which elements of a desktop page are displayed or not displayed on the different devices, you may still be left with a page that just does not present well or fails to get the message across. You can sometimes find that due to the nature of your audience and how they want to process information, presenting iPhone specific content with less pages could be the way to go in which case developing a separate mobile version is a good idea. Depending on your CMS platform this may or may not be a lot of hard work. We use Business Catalyst for all our web solutions which provides us with 3 choices on how to deliver mobile compatible solutions - including responsive design, separate mobile site or a hybrid approach mixing the two - all from the one set of source code in the back end. I hope this clarifies things a bit more for you both and anyone else reading this article.