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Philip Brookes answered a question

Philip Brookes

Philip Brookes, Director at Aktiv Digital

That's a far more complicated question than it sounds - mainly because it requires us to define "traditional marketing". I know that sounds picky, because we all know that "traditional marketing" is everything except digital marketing. But from my perspective, digital marketing is actually a subset of traditional marketing - it's just grown into huge prominence (with good reason). It's never going to 'replace' traditional marketing.

Let me explain - traditional marketing has always been about establishing an optimal marketing mix. It's about reaching your target audience through the most appropriate channels - TV, radio, direct mail, print media, PR, etc... But in the past couple of decades we've added a huge swathe of additional potential channels - web sites, eDM, social media. And not just to push out advertising, but to truly engage with your audience.

So in one sense traditional marketing has just been radically expanded.

However, if I understand your question rightly, I suspect you're really asking if old marketing/advertising channels are becoming less and less relevant.

Again, I would argue that "it depends". Horses for courses. When you take a look at the advertising that's on TV these days, most of the big brands are still there. For those with the budget and the appropriate audience, mass media can still be a valuable part of the marketing mix.

But there's an increasing number of smaller businesses who are now able to compete against bigger players and reach an audience on much smaller budgets than was (is) required for mass media advertising. So we now have a much greater level of marketing activity across the entire spectrum of businesses.

I certainly believe that digital marketing is an imperative for virtually every business these days, whereas older/mass media advertising formats are not as universally applicable. It's also much more accessible no matter how large or small your business is. In sheer numbers, there are a lot more marketing/advertising consultants/agencies/providers competing for your digital marketing business than there is for other forms of marketing/advertising.

But I don't believe that most of the 'traditional' advertising channels are of any less relevance today (with the exception perhaps of advertising in niche market magazines - these are typically struggling to maintain circulation of their print editions and the audiences are largely moving online). Radio, TV, loyalty programs, PR, event marketing, etc... all continue to be an essential part of the marketing mix for numerous businesses IF they are targeting those audiences and have appropriate budgets. We just need to understand how much exposure each of these channels will actually get.

Steve Osborne

Steve Osborne , director at Steve Osborne / Smarthinking

Agreed 100%. Could not have put it better.
Jef Lippiatt

Jef Lippiatt , Owner at Startup Chucktown

Very robust and centered answer. Great explanation of how digital marketing fits into the overall picture.
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Justin Dry answered a question

Justin Dry

Justin Dry, Owner at Vinomofo

I actually live by this rule as often as possible and it has served me well. As far as Vinomofo goes I would say our most valuable time has been spent on delivering the best possible product. Make it so good that your customers do the marketing for you. On the flip side if your product is shit no amount of advertising is going to save you.
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Phil Khor answered a question

Phil Khor

Phil Khor, Founder at SavvySME

  • Add in your daily to do list a time when you deal with certain things. E.g. A time for checking and responding to emails
  • Similar to the first point, if people constantly come to you throughout the day to speak to you, make it a point and make it known that they will need to come back to you at a certain time which you have allocated to such issues
  • I'll have to steal Jef's response here. Don't deal with individual problems. There are patterns and trends. Find ways to systemise everything. The trick is in anticipating problems and planning how you will respond before the issues come up.
  • Miriam Miles

    Miriam Miles , Founder at Resonate - Online Presence Development

    I agree Phil, understanding where the problems are hiding is worth the time it takes to find them. I read a lot by an author called Andrew Church who talks about this - finding the root cause of the problem and then setting up better systems that inhibit it's recurrence as well as dealing wiht the root in the first place.
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    Rebecca Carroll-Bell

    Rebecca Carroll-Bell, Owner at RCB Mediation Services

    1. Knowing that I can often make a time to deal with the unexpected issue e.g. make a time to call someone back, tell them I will have an answer for them by a certain date, and so on. I often find that if you listen to someone, acknowledge their situation then tell them what you will do and when you will do it, that it enough to keep them satisfied in the short term, allowing you to keep control over your time and schedule.

    2. For issues that are beyond my control and expertise e.g. technical or computer problems, I have learned to outsource early. I used to waste so much time trying to figure out how to fix things for myself. Now I am building a team of people who I can call on in times of need to get the problem fixed ASAP.

    3. Communication. Talk early, talk often.If something comes up that will effect workflow and delivery down the track, I contact my other clients/colleagues/contacts and let them know ASAP. By giving as much notice as possible and a little insight into why I need to reschedule or postpone, I find others are a lot more accomdating and supportive.

    Miriam Miles

    Miriam Miles , Founder at Resonate - Online Presence Development

    Love your answers Rebecca! I agree with delegating early - it's incredible how we are capable of learning so much but that doesn't always mean we can fix the problems just be learning. And communication is definitely key to healthy relationships in the long term. Thanks for your advice :D
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    Melanie Gray answered a question

    Is it Illegal to not pay super ?

    Can a small business avoid paying super for say 6 months or so ?

    Melanie Gray

    Melanie Gray, Managing Owner at MyCL (My Computer Lab)

    Not all employees need to pay super.It is illegal not to pay super to those entitled for super in Australiahttps://www.ato.gov.au/business/super-for-employer...
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    Shaun Farrugia

    Shaun Farrugia, Director at Optimised Accounting

    Hi Uttam,Businesses need to pay employees super at least every three months. Whilst you could not physically pay super for 6 months it is against the law.The official time frame is as follows:July - September - Payable by 28 OctoberOctober - December - Payable by 28 JanuaryJanuary - March - Payable by 28 AprilApril - June - Payable by 28 July.The penalties for not paying super by these dates are fairly stiff. With SuperStream becoming mandatory from July 1 I'd be expecting that the ATO will start monitoring this a lot more carefully in the very near future. Hope this helps,Shaun
    Uttam Jha

    Uttam Jha , Owner at Tyche Infotech Pty Ltd

    Thanks Shaun - Noted :)
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    Brian Dorricott answered a question

    Brian Dorricott

    Brian Dorricott, Startup Guide at Meteorical

    Absolutely - test and measure.But perhaps you're on the wrong track"The price of being unremarkable is advertising."So how can you make yourself more remarkable so that word-of-mouth (still the best form of introduction) can happen? Check out the Gaddie Pitch as a way to articulate this.

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    Maini Homer

    Maini Homer, Owner at Infinity NLP Coaching

    Generally the rule of thumb is to test and measure... Ask yourself this.... If you found a source of advertising that paid you $10,000 for every $1000 spent, how much would you throw at it?

    Daniel Spark

    Daniel Spark , Director

    I agree Maini, test and measure. There is not a magic number that will suit every business. There is no use spending more money on advertising than you see returned, although sometimes the return is not easily measurable.
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    Steve Osborne answered a question

    What is your favourite or preferred project management system?

    These days there are so many management platforms such as Asana, Active Collab, Trello, Podio Teamwork PM. Which one do you use and why?

    Steve Osborne

    Steve Osborne, director at Steve Osborne / Smarthinking

    Maria

    After looking at quite a few including a couple already mentioned and several highly sophisticated (expensive!) tools, I went with Project Bubble.

    It fits my main criteria in that it's intuitive to use, shareable and has easily defined tasks. Plus, it's okay to look at.

    Maria Nikas

    Maria Nikas , Founder/CEO at Limitless Virtual Assistant

    Hi Steve, I haven't heard of that one I must check it out as I like to know what is out there.
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    Iain Dooley

    Iain Dooley, Owner at The Procedure People

    I use *shudder* Basecamp CLASSIC.

    I really want to use something else and constantly evaluate various PM systems that come my way, but the one feature that I simply can't do without is the ability to see a calendar with all milestones for all people across all projects.

    Everything else is secondary and can be solved with processes or API customisations (albeit cumbersome to do so in places).

    I've seen a few "gantt" plugins that purport to sit on top of Trello etc. but haven't had the chance to evaluate any yet ... if anyone else has some war stories or recommendations I'd love to hear them.

    Thanks, Iain

    Lisa Ormenyessy

    Lisa Ormenyessy , Business Coach and Marketing Specialist at Straight Talk Group

    Iain, I 'shudder' use a to-do list - combined with outlook. Works for me :)
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    Lina Barfoot answered a question

    What are your thoughts on smart watches?

    Perhaps I'm a bit jaded, but I don't see the allure of the forthcoming Apple watch. I don't believe that interacting with a screen that small will be very efficient from a usability / ergonomics perspective. I think older ideas around multi-function watches are more interesting say, Dick Tracey's Walkie-Talkie watch or James Bond's watch that can shoot lasers among other things.

    Lina Barfoot

    Lina Barfoot, Editor at SavvySME

    I'm obviously very late to this question but I just have to vent; I hate them. I do not see the appeal at all. They seem completely superfluous to me.

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    Chelsea Creamer answered a question

    Why should you stay as an "Anonymous" LinkedIn member?

    Let's talk about a controversial setting in LinkedIn called, “Who’s Viewed My Profile?” This setting controls what is shown to LinkedIn users whose profile you have viewed. 

    To be accused of stalking someone is strong language, but I agree. At least have the decency to tell the other LinkedIn member what company or industry you’re from. Help me figure out why some LinkedIn members will activate that controversial privacy setting?

    In my opinion you may have perfectly good reasons for being anonymous when you surf profiles on LinkedIn and it’s none of my business why you would want to but you ought to be aware that anonymity can be fleeting and you run the real risk of being exposed. Here’s the scenario – you decide to cloak yourself in anonymity and change the appropriate setting before you go and browse. You feel confident that no one you browse can identify you and you’d be correct. Except that you then go back to your settings and switch back to showing your name & headline.

    If you then visit the same profile you browsed anonymously, LinkedIn will switch your previous anonymous footprint to your name & headline. The lesson? Browse anonymously forever but if you decide to stop being anonymous, don’t re-visit the profiles you browsed when you were HIDDEN. LinkedIn currently allows paid users to see 90 days of browsing activity.

    When you opt for the anonymous profile characteristics (PARTIAL), you’re neither identifying yourself nor being anonymous. Because your footprint can be clicked, you’re leading a not so merry chase. It’s an odd way to do business and does you no favours. My advice? – Go HIDDEN and don’t waste anybody’s time or go FULL and reap the potential rewards of being found on a network of 225m+ professionals. Don’t be a deer in the headlights; make a decision – get off the road or go with the flow.

    So, are you ready to jump out of the shadows by changing your setting to “visible?” or do you have a different point of view?

    Regards,

    Cassidy Poon Digital & Social Marketing Manager LogicalTech Group

    Chelsea Creamer

    Chelsea Creamer, Community Manager at SavvySME

    Cassidy is totally right - it nails your professional online identity. In any case, there's always the account settings section and the save changes button :)

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    Ling Lee

    Ling Lee, at Digital Marketing and Personal Branding

    Stalking on a social networking site is a key sign that a network is user engaging, in my opinion. I have no objections to being open in my profile. It is like an online resume. After all, the ultimate aim is to extend profile reach to as many people as possible.

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    Deborah Vella answered a question

    Are Internal Processes or External Brand Perception in the Driver's Seat?

    What do I mean? Simply what is currently a larger driver of your business (for better or worse)

    • What keeps you up at night?
    • Are you more bias to positive or negative feedback (internally and externally)?
    • Are your internal processes causing efficiencies or inefficiencies further down in your business?
    • Is your brand perception positively or negatively impacting you (and are you doing anything about it)?

    I'm looking forward to all of the answers. Feel free to tack on additional questions if you feel I missed any that are related.

    Deborah Vella

    Deborah Vella, Owner at Support Legal

    Both internal processes and external brand perception are important in business. As the owner of a law practice providing legal services, the external brand perception for Support Legal and personal reputation of myself as a lawyer are crucial to successful practice.

    That being said, my internal processes go along way to maintaining a quality brand perception and good legal services. Therefore I believe that you can't have success in one without success in the other.

    Jef Lippiatt

    Jef Lippiatt , Owner at Startup Chucktown

    Great answer. Thanks for giving examples.
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    Brian Dorricott answered a question

    How can startups raise funds?

    How do startups raise funds? What does the process look like?

    Brian Dorricott

    Brian Dorricott, Startup Guide at Meteorical

    Some stats for you. 88% of new business use the Entrepreneur's, family, friends, neighbours, etc. funds. 8% use Business Angels and 4% use Venture Capitalists.Money from freinds and family is also easier to obtain since they believe in you. When you go to strangers, you are in sales mode which makes it challenging... always check out any grants that are available too (although they can come with reporting strings attached).I'd only recommend selling equity (i.e. .to Business Angels and Venture Capitalists) when every other single avenue (including banks) has been exhausted. 

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    Jules Brooke

    Jules Brooke, Founder and Director at Handle Your Own PR

    Whatever type of investor you are chasing (and I loved Jef's answer as it really explains the different options well) I would also suggest that you should try and get some publicity for the business first.

    It's free if you approach the media yourself (I have to admit that I teach PR to small businesses so I have a subjective perspective!) and the benefits are that it gives credibility to your business and the endorsement of a media outlet can be priceless. It establishes you as a 'real' business for potential investors and somehow implies solidity.

    If your business is a start up then it is probably offering some sort of innovation, or solving a problem, so use that to make it an interesting story for the metro newspapers to write about. Or go to radio producers and see if you can get an interview.

    It's a worthwhile exercise if you want to impress the investors!

    Jef Lippiatt

    Jef Lippiatt , Owner at Startup Chucktown

    Thank you for the compliment. I think you are exactly right as well. You need to start building awareness before you go out pitching or looking for funding. Grow your mailing list ahead of launching crowdfunding that way you can blast out your crowdfunding launch to a large group of people that have already expressed interest. Work on creating a simple, clean an minimal slide deck for presentations (don't over-complicate it with too many slides).
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