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5 effective ways to network like a superstar

Have you ever been to a networking event where you were introduced to a new person and despite your best efforts, you still couldn't get the conversation to go anywhere?  Those are rather awkward times.  I've been there myself and wondered what I was doing wrong?  There had to be a better way to connect with people and begin to create a positive networking rapport with them, I just needed to find it. This was the beginning of my reflective and active exploration into networking tips and techniques that actually work to build rapport between people.  I wanted to know how to better understand the people that I interact with.  I had a burning desire to understand what drives people to move towards an opportunity or to run for the hills away from it.  As I travel by train a lot, I read every day for at least an hour.  I listen to audio education programs and I contemplate what I learn, especially how I can apply it to my daily life and be of service to those I work with.   The train and my car (audio only) provide the perfect mobile university for me to self-educate on the topics that of greatest interest to me.   I read and listened to anything I could find from people who had been there and done that so I could learn from the best.  I read books and articles on networking, human behaviour, coaching, management, leadership, culture, selling psychology and NLP.  A colleague gave me Brian Tracy's book Eat That Frog so I could learn more about time management.  This was a very fortunate event, as Brian Tracy is an International Expert on many subjects including sales psychology, customer relationships, branding and public speaking.  Undertaking this self-education has been invaluable to me as I love to learn and I love to apply what I learn.   One of the best things I have learned is how to reframe how a client or customer 'sees' you or 'associates' to you.  It is as simple as changing your title from Sales to Consultant.  That was a gem for me.  I am passionate about the benefits of using reframing to help other people see you differently, as I am sure you can tell. Last year, I was fortunate to have a professional Coach who taught me about coaching people through their fears, resistance and how to influence them to want to make changes rather than being pushed into a metaphorical corner.  I learned how to encourage the people I was coaching how to feel safe with me, how to get them to open up to me and discuss topics that were affecting their personal and professional life.   I also learned how to ask open-ended questions and to listen closely to what was being said and more importantly, to listen to what was not being said.  Sometimes what people do not say is the one thing they want to discuss.   I find this quite exciting.  Below are my 5 effective ways to Network like a Superstar: When you enter the Networking event, take a moment to observe the room.  Watch people (not like a stalker please!).  Watch them and get a feel for the dynamics of the people interacting in the room.  Be confident and approachable as you find your networking feet. Go up to someone who looks friendly and introduce yourself, shake hands as touch will create a positive rapport between two people.  People will do business with you because you are a nice person.  Being a nice and genuine person will help you connect. Ask them open ended questions about who they are, what they do, what else do they do in life.  Ask them why they are so interested/passionate about their topic? And ask them to tell you more.  Give them time to answer.  Sometimes people need a moment to collect their thoughts, so don't jump in to answer your own question.  Use the Stand and Listen technique.  Stand and wait for the answer, then pay attention.  Let them get specific and listen for interesting information that you can use to repeat back to them to help them to continue to talk to you.  Sometimes a conversation needs a little extra encouragement to keep it going.  After a little while the conversation will deepen as they realise that you are also a nice person and truly interested in who they are and what they are about. Give them good eye contact (but please, don't stare them down - awkward much!).  Glance away from time to time but don't start staring off into space either as this says that you find them dead boring and want to leave for a better conversationalist.  If you want other to listen to your elevator pitch, you need to give them time to give you theirs.  I'm just saying...   Also, if you decide that you want to network with them outside of the event, make sure that you are giving them good body language! Write down interesting facts they have shared with you on the back of their business cards.  That way you will become even more interesting and memorable to them when they realise that you have remembered something special about them from the event.   People are flattered when you take the time to remember something special about them.  They are more inclined to open up to you, to confide in you and trust you.  Trust is what we want to foster and the chances of a positive business relationship increase.   The more you actively listen, the more they will think you are a Superstar conversationalist and networker. I Networking is about sharing information AND receiving it.  You must be a good receiver as well as a giver.  If you are out of balance, you won't have many networking connections.  So take a moment to reflect on your style and how it has been working for or against you.  Networking is all about practicing good public relations.  The benefits are enormously valuable to your reputation, so make sure you SHINE in a humble way.

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Are your press releases worth the effort?

The main reason a press release (PR) is produced is strictly for a newsworthy dissemination. This is the first thing you should remember and remember hard. This is because all too often PRs produced even though newsworthy, it is presented in the wrong way and this can be highly detrimental for your company. You would want to present your news across to the editors and journalists so that they would publish your PR. Therefore, you are submitted to the will of the editor and journalist until you do something right. Whatever you place in the PR is for the interest of them. What are they interested in? They are interested in pleasing their audience and readers. How to satisfy these editors and journalists? Think like you’re a reporter receiving the raw news from your own company eg. AnimalShelter. Your company has discovered that there is a steep rise in abandoned animals due to the negligence of teenage owners. Now, you’re in charge of producing a PR. Using a reporter’s perspective, I have no interest in promoting AnimalShelter as it adds no value to me. In other words, stay objective and impersonal. Write out the PR and send it through. I strongly advice against contacting the publications to ask whether they received your PR because editors are really time-constraint and have no time to entertain one of the hundreds PRs they receive in a day. That’s why it is so important to create a straightforward, puffery-free PR with an eye-catching heading. Imagine editors as really hungry hard-to-capture animals (no intent of degrading). What they really want is a nice juicy chunk of meat. Throw them a great PR and they will fight to get your story published. Back to AnimalShelter, you must be asking; “How do I write a good press release?” First of all, you must have a strong title. The stronger the title, the bigger and chunkier the piece of meat going to be. When thinking of a title, avoid lengthy words and bush-beating. Go straight for the kill and lay-down a good overview of your story concisely. For example, instead of “AnimalShelter has discovered, after substantive research, the reason why there is a steep increase in abandoned animals”; try something like “Abandoned animals rise due to negligent teens”. Then, the subhead has to be equally important as the header. Often overlooked by writers, subhead gives an opportunity to flash your angle on the story. A subhead can sound something like “Gen-Y; a more careless generation towards animals but hates to admit to it”. Moving on, your thesis statement has to be factual and straight to the point. Leave out your ego and save your flaunting skills for another time. State what has to be given to editors. An easy way to figure this out is to answer the Wh-questions; who, what, when, when, where, why and how. The company details are also important because people want to know what the company does and it gives the editors an easier task by not having to research on the parties involved. Next, the body of the PR has to state the specific details of the news like numbers and specific people. In conjunction with mentioning specific people, adding quotes will further enhance your PR. Plus; quotes are great because it’s something that editors have minimal editing power to. Add contact details of yourself or if you’re comfortable enough, you can add the details of the source. This is done because if the editor likes your story, he or she has to want more information from you. It is good practice to add in a link for an online copy of your PR. Other points to be aware of are: Don’t give away all the details - You want a hook and meat good enough to bring the editors in, and then you’ll give the killing blow. Write from a journalist’s perspective - Do not use “I” or “we” Have little to no slang words - Some slang might be very normal and understandable by you but editors reading your PR might not even be a local in your country. Keep hyped-up punctuations minimal - It’s a PR not a tabloid magazine. Follow up immediately with your press kit (images and news releases) when contacted Call them back after sending in your press kit to make sure they received it - This is different from calling them when you send your PR because the editor has already bit into your hook. Lastly, add in “###” directly below the last line of your PR. It is to show that it’s the end of your PR. I know that there’s a lot of take in but I’m sure when you get into the flow of things, PR writing will only get easier. ###

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Bring your point home

Every business has a point to make to each and every one of its audiences. Whether internal or external, customers or communities, your business needs to be making its message clear. The first stage of this, and where many businesses fall down, is understanding what the message or point actually is. Before shouting from the treetops it is a good idea to know what you're shouting about, and an even better idea to have some sort of plan around making sure the people you're telling are going to hear it the way you want them to. The message you are communicating, your point, isn't necessarily the same as the words you wrap it up in. While you might run a customer promotion or sale offer, your message can be more about value - either value for money or valuing your customers, than it is about selling. This distinction is what sets apart good campaigns from great communication. Your business has stories to tell, no matter what stage it is at or what it does or makes. Knowing how to tell your story, when to do it and who should be told is hard to get just right. When you are in your business every day it can be especially difficult to be objective about the things you do. You can often find yourself thinking everything you do is a great story and one everyone wants to hear. Unfortunately your story has to compete with hundreds of others your audiences hear in their day, which means you need to make it stand out. PR, advertising, marketing and any other communications strategists talk about "key messages", but what are they really? And how do you distil everything your business stands for, delivers and achieves in to a relatively small number of them? The first thing I look for when devising key messages is the "why". Why does the business exist, why does it do things the way it does, why do people need to care? The next is "what". What are the fundamental things that make this business or product what it is? The final one is "how". How is the business actually delivering on the why and what in the real world? I know this is a relatively narrow assessment criteria (especially give the 5W and H rule generally used), however it is intentionally that way. By being concise and looking for only the most important parts the key messages used become the foundation for everything your business says. The rest can be built on them, always linking back to the core of what the business is about. They become the point of your business and can help you drive not only what the business says, but its culture and future development as well. With the key messages, or point, of the business distilled they can be engrained in everything that is done. It is here that the title of this article comes in - the point can be brought home, or maybe more accurately the point can become home.  Be clinical with your assessment of your business or products, and revisit your key messages from time to time to make sure they are still as relevant as they can be.  

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Have you exeperiences the 'Care-Less Customer Service' Cause and Effect issue

It is a sad reality these days that good customer services is an ever-widening chasm of pain for the people to endure.  I am personally saddened to have experienced exceptionally bad customer service from the Head Office of a Network Marketing Company that I was once a part of.  This Company continually spoke to their Consultants about the importance of providing excellent customer service, but when it came to actually providing it to me, I found things to be very different indeed.   When I approached this Company's Head Office for assistance to obtain a financial income statement for my tax purposes, I was told that they could not help me because it was something only I could access through the online portal. When I advised them that I couldn't log in, they then told me it was because my account had been frozen as I had not advised them that I was continuing the business and I had not paid them money to do so. I was shocked by this and could not find any emails to confirm that I had to do this or pay them money for another year's registration.   When I advised them of this, they told me that they do not send reminder emails to pay this to Consultants as it is in the online account as a 45 day reminder.  I went through all of the numerous emails that they had sent to me (which was akin to spam levels) and could not find any correspondence outlining this fine print.  I can safely say that I never saw that reminder in that time frame when I could access their system and when I tried to log in, the system would not allow me.   The more that this Company 'hog-tied' me with their distancing responses and lack of interest in providing any assistance, the angrier I felt.  It takes quite a lot of frustration for me to come to a point of complaining, yet, even my complaints were received with a lack of interest.  The tone of their emails to me were written in such a way as to distance themselves from providing me with any help in this situation.  I felt frustrated and angry that no-one from this business would do anything other than respond by telling me that I needed to look through my old emails to find a commission email.   I am deeply saddened that this Company and many other businesses seem to have this 'Care-Less Customer Service Factor' as a part of their culture.   As a customer, I am looking to do business with people who care about me and my needs.  If they do not and I receive responses as I have recently experienced, I cannot help but feel enraged by such treatment. So what is the fallout effect from this unfortunate 'Care-Less Customer Service' cause?   It is simply hypocritical to say one thing and do another, as this networking business has done.  This kind of behavior destroys trust and the one thing that they can be assured of, is that I will always remember how they made me feel. I will now tell at least 10 people about this experience and spread the word on their lack of congruency and professional integrity between word and deed.  This is not good for their reputation and stands as a warning for any business or service providers to be alert to. Even if people think that my situation is me 'making a mountain out of mole hill', the point to remember is that clients not only remember the type of service they receive, but they tell people about it, especially if they are upset by a genuine lack of care from the employees on the other end.   A 'Care-Less Customer Service' Factor can be the cause of a business spiralling into reputation MUD.     

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How to leverage the news cycle for publicity

It is a time-honoured tradition that defines the daily news agenda – and is a golden opportunity that you can potentially exploit to maximise free publicity for your business or brand. For decades, news outlets have been news sources for each other in what is commonly known as the news cycle. Knowing how this cycle works and how to leverage it can potentially deliver huge exposure for your business, giving you a distinct advantage over your competitors. Before the disruptive influence of the internet and social media, the news cycle formula followed a simple linear pattern: Generally, stories in the first 6-10 pages of a typical morning newspaper would be lifted by radio and TV stations to use in their fixed bulletins and programs through the day. Today, it is more like a news cyclone - or, if you prefer, the news recycle, such is the volume and prevalence of media outlets repurposing each other's news stories to fill column inches, pixels and airtime (sometimes for the sake of it):   Talk show radio hosts lift live breakfast TV stories originally printed in the morning papers whose online editors run radio grabs while bloggers syndicate top news stories (including paywall content) as behind-the-scenes TV producerstrade tapes with rival networks whose footage floods their Facebook pages as print reporters retweet press conference soundbites streamed live in midday bulletins built with grabs from rival radio talk show hosts while – underscoring them all – wire service journalists are filing continuous takes from every other outlet, fanning the flames of an ongoing story and on and on and on …   Phew! Tiring, or what? Just imagine it was your story that was their talking point for the day! So, knowing now how it all works, what can you do to potentially get your portion of publicity and own the attention of the media for at least a few hours? 1. Ensure you have a strong story idea - your pitch to media will be only as good and successful as the product, service or expertise you are offering up. Free media exposure is vastly more credible and effective than simply paying to advertise because what you have or what you know is newsworthy and therefore earns the media’s attention. 2. Think about the key ingredients of any successful headline story: Controversy / Conflict Human interest Impact New / Exclusive Topical / Relevance / Current Affairs Does your story or idea have at least one of the above elements? Is your commentary or opinion contentious, even outright CONTROVERSIAL? If not, … Does your pitch have the HUMAN INTEREST factor, the emotion? Is it an idea involving people? Honestly ask yourself: does your story really have IMPACT? Will it make a difference (to the readers and listeners of your target media)? Is your idea, product or pitch NEW and shiny and never seen-nor-heard before? In other words, is it EXCLUSIVE? Is your idea CURRENT, TOPICAL and RELEVANT in today’s news agenda 3. Hijack a breaking news story or event Newsjacking is the art of hijacking the daily news agenda, particularly a developing news story, by injecting your ideas or commentary to generate publicity. While business risk consultancy New Risk may not have purposely newsjacked the story of missing Malaysian Airlines flight MH370, this is a perfect example of offering an exclusive, high impact, emotional and topical idea which garnered huge headlines internationally. What you can do: Establish a reliable real-time media monitoring process – including online and social media alerts (e.g. Google alerts, Mention) and RSS feeds – for issues relevant to your industry or sector; Be ready with a rapid response media statement and factsheet template to pull together a quick comment on a breaking news story or event; Pitch your media statement with ‘available for interview’ notice into newsrooms with a handful of follow-up phone calls to key influential journalists on your media list (see next point). Expand your media statement into an ‘expert comment’ article to publish instantly across your own digital and social media properties. 4. Build your own custom media list - of key journalists covering your industry issues, specifically a broad mix of print and online (including social media editors), radio & TV – including talkback program hosts and behind-the-scenes producers – high profile commentators, newsroom Chiefs-of-Staff, even wire service writers. Better still, start building a relationship with them today, including offering them different story ideas with no expectation of any publicity or interviews in return. Then, when the big occasion does arise, you’ll be much better placed to capitalise. Ensure your key contacts are also on speed dial. From time to time, it will help to use a paid media release distribution service (so start exploring account options today), but maintain – and respect - your media list as much as your own personal contacts. 5. Get your Google footprint in shape – one of the first places a journalist will go to is Google to look for follow-up information about your business, industry or the issues of the day. Will you be there, top of the rankings, or at least on the first search page and preferably above the fold? By ensuring your SEO is up-to-date – your web, blog and social media content and keywords are current – you increase the chances of being found by journalists wanting more of you! 6. Direct them to your digital domains Today, all journalists are time-poor and under incredible pressure to file multiple stories the same day, so bogging them down with long-winded press releases is a quick route to the recycle bin. Similarly, incessant follow-up phone calls will result in short change. So make it easy for them. Give them the tantalising essentials of your pitch with the call-to-action inviting them to visit your website, blog or Slideshare presentation to get the full picture. Of course, your digital domains will already be loaded with useful, practical information (they will, won’t they?). If the journalists like what they see, if your offer truly is compelling, then they will more likely contact you for an interview or further information. Your goal is to get others talking about you and your ideas (as well as talking TO you): this means you being seen as an influential industry expert; of having the talked-about opinion or product of the day; of having something that people will want to read and share, particularly on social media. Over to you: have you successfully exploited the news cycle, or been part of a topical story widely covered by multiple media outlets? Please share your stories and questions in the comments below. Like this article? If so, please share with your networks. (After all, knowledge is for sharing.)

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How to Write a Publishing Worthy Press Release

Writing a press release to a publication about massive events regarding your company or any major news related to it is very important.  But in order to write a press release that is actually worth being published (in the eyes of journalists and media publications at least), you need to be aware of some subtleties. Here is your number one guide that will help you write press releases no publication can say no to! There is an art to writing press releases. Some people make the mistake of writing brand promos and sales pieces that make a journo’s eyes roll the minute they read the headline. Others keep them so stale that a journo has clicked the trash button on the email before they have even finished the second paragraph. Although, there is no exact science to writing a great press release (or at least one that a journalist will read to completion), the key is that your ‘presser’ has the right balance between being engaging and informative. Here is a foolproof checklist you can employ next time you sit down to write a kick-ass press release! 1. Make it newsworthy A journalist is looking for something topical and interesting that is going to prove valuable to their readers. Ask yourself, why would these readers want to know what is in your press release? Am I giving them something that is going to interest, educate, inform or entertain them? This is vital! Examples of newsworthy press release topics include: A fundraiser/donation/sponsorship, Response to current social trending topics, Business expansions/re-developments, A big event, anniversary or recognition (award), CEO or company announcements or recent activity announcement that effect different stakeholder groups (industry specific news), Client profiles - especially if they are doing something that would be seen as insightful or important for the readers, Case studies, where you have worked on a successful project that provides valuable insights on cost savings, improvements for your clients, things that readers of the publication will find useful. 2. Is it publish-ready? Journalists are busy people. They work on very tight deadlines and generally have multiple stories in the works at any one time. Add to this, they usually are inundated with hundreds of press releases a day (and I mean literally hundreds), especially if they are a big publication. Therefore, if you can make their job easier by providing them with a ready-to-publish story, you’re not only going to drastically improve your chances of getting your press release picked up and run, but leave a positive impression on the journalist. Also, while making your pitch slim on your name mentions (i.e. brand or key spokesperson’s) and in a style that is ‘journalistic,’ the editor has little to do to run it, making the turnaround rate from pitched to published easy and quick. This can also enhance your chances of being their first point of contact when they have a story and need an expert quote or commentary in the future. Consider the trending topics covered in the publication. Some publications have a features list, so by knowing this you can tailor your article angle and pitch on something that is top of mind for them at the time. Other times, a publication will not have a features list. In such cases, it is important to know what the needs of the readers are as this is always the consideration of the publisher. For instance, you could look over some back issues and identify some key topics or visit the magazine’s website to provide you with insight into the things that matter to their audience. 3. Informative engaging headline A short, sharp and informative headline is the first thing your journalist reads. It is important to take some time in developing a captivating headline. If it is bad, it might be the only thing they read. Don’t shoot yourself in the foot before you’ve even had a chance to plead your case. Headlines tell you a lot about a story and work to captivate your audience. If your journo isn’t captivated, chances are their readers won’t be either. We are, by nature, skim readers – so headlines are paramount to the success of your pitch. Below are key things to consider when writing your headline to entice the reader to read your first sentence! Your headline: Should be unique with your core message standing out, Must be ultra-specific, your goal is to make them think its worth their while reading on, Must convey a sense of urgency, create a feeling of miss-out, Should be useful, your goal is to communicate the benefit they will get from reading on. 4. Keep it short Succinct writing is good writing. There is no reason that your press release should be pushing more than two pages. If it’s longer than that, it’s not a press release, it’s a book chapter! On average, a press release is between 400 to 800 words. 5. Strong quotes Your quotes should be the backbone of your presser. Without them, the information has no leg to stand on. Ideally, you should use someone who is considered “authority” to quote. E.g. a CEO, a researcher or academic expert, etc. Ensure your expert/speaker is: prominent, credible, providing good content. 6. Tell a story As any good PR student has ever been told, the most important piece of journalistic writing gives you the 5 w’s in one sentence: who, what when, where and why. Yet, more often that not, they don’t teach you how to creatively flavour your writing to find the balance that will allow you to captivate and inform your readers simultaneously. In this case, practice makes perfect so the key is to just start. These are just a few key points to consider when writing a press release that can help you avoid the most common mistakes people make. Writing releases that get the attention of journalists is an art in itself and requires practice and experience in order to position the story to potential media. If you are seeking to lift your profile and awareness and looking for ways to capitalise on your work without direct advertising, then Public Relations is an activity you should add to your marketing plan in 2018.

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Power up your PR! Now packed with even more nutrients and juice.

PR releases are so boring. I find them to be as depressing as financial statements. To me, the term “PR release” brings to mind someone trumpeting news about the new, fabulous and glorious features of a new product. It’s great that new things are shiner and prettier than the previous models. But, I would probably thank you more by being sneaky in your advertising. So, that is why I want to share with you a new way of framing PR releases by calling it a PR story. The (ever so trustworthy) Oxford dictionary defines a ‘story’ as “an account of imaginary or real people and events told for entertainment.” On the other hand, ‘release’ as a verb is stated as “to allow (information) be generally available.” Do you want your PR to become ‘generally available’, or be ‘entertaining’?  A quick Google search has indicated that I am not the first person to come up with this tactic, but it sure is a fresh take on PR writing, no? More about the ‘story’ – entertainment is key to engagement. There’s a reason why accounting lectures are empty. In terms of content, always maintain an optimistic tone, but do not go overboard. I always get asked how I can sound so enthusiastic. The key is to get fired up about it yourself. If you’ve just had a long, hard and stressful day, sitting down for an extra couple of hours to write a press release (pardon me, press story) will not make you any happier. Nor will it do any justice to your writing. Be strategic in your content – SEO concerns should come second to content. Here is where some marketing psychology comes in. People only really read what they want to read. Therefore, make sure you include relevant key words, but statistics only when needed. Ask yourself, what can YOU offer to your customer that's noteworthy? For example, if you want to market your company’s mission or values, a good way to convey this is how you came to that particular idea or value. What happened that made you want to develop that product? Then, the next step is to consider being in your consumer’s shoes - why should I listen to you? I really love personal stories, because its so much more genuine, original, and more easy to emphasise with. Thirdly, Please do not waffle. Sometimes, the best types of writing are short and succinct. Too much repetition of a certain word turns people off. For example, consider this quote. A new website offers the “best deals…best offers…best page…best product.” The first two ‘bests’ are ok – but with the third ‘best’, it starts to get stale. Replace it with something wackier like ‘awesome’ or ‘fantastic’. Remember, we live in the era of Microsoft Word synonyms. What you do need to emphasise is your key message, or what actions you want your reader to undertake. You may want them to like a particular Facebook page, try out a new feature of your site, or to download an app. A good way to do this is to open your PR material with an action item – eg. Download our new app! Multimedia contents such as images are a bonus – but if it takes too much time and money, don’t worry about it. If you do consider walking down this avenue, be creative – do you want to make a video or an infographic? Unconventional PR stints that have recently come into popularity include game apps. User engagement – tick. Customer experience – tick. Company reputation? Depends.   Be sure that your company is identifiable, and what you get out is worth your time and resources.   What I have just written is extremely idealistic. I absolutely understand that there is no one winning strategy for PR, and what I have outlined above may not work with every company. Appropriateness is another crucial component of PR writing that one must take into consideration. B2B and B2C marketing styles are different, too.  Ultimately, PR writing is a skill much like essay and journalistic writing that requires practice and drafts to make it right. Power on with those verbs, people!  

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Press releases and websites that helps you get the word out

A press release is pseudo-news story, written in third person that seeks to demonstrate to an editor or reporter the newsworthiness of a particular person, event, service or product. Fraser Seitel, an American public relations consultant and author, refers to press releases (PR) as being, “the granddaddy of public relations writing vehicles”. Press releases are vital to maintain a good and fresh image of your company. In addition, PR is a great way to resolve issues regarding any public uproar. For example, McDonalds™ might release news about how they have donated millions to poverty-stricken countries right after a detrimental reveal on how lavish the lifestyles of McDonalds™ board of directors are. PRs are important because it propagates to any available channel there is out there in the world. It’s up to the public relations department to decide where the press releases go to because; referring to the earlier example, not all countries are concerned about the lifestyle of McDonalds™ board of directors. Here’s a list of websites that you should check out: 1. Get The Word Out Specialised in only sending press releases out to editors and journalists. This site doesn’t have a page that shows published articles that is sent out by them.   2. Seeking Media A Melbourne-based company. Prices for a PR are reasonable compared to others, plus, there are many options to customise where you want to aim your PR to.     3. PRWire A NSW-based company. They place importance on PRs that are related to Australia and New Zealand.     4. Press King A French company. The website and PR writing is simple and user-friendly. Prices are rather expensive; there’s a PAYG option or a monthly subscription.   5. Newswire Today This website offers a range of services from free submission of PRs to premium articles distribution for a reasonable price.   6. Press About Another user-friendly website that also offers help in writing PRs. Prices are charge for the number of PRs you want.   7. Business Wire A Berkshire Hathaway company. Provides a wide range of services not only in PRs but also Investor Relations (IR) and Search Engine Optimisation (SEO).   8. Web Wire An American company that is founded in 1995. States that they are pioneers of other interest press release websites. Clear with the prices they charge and services coming from it.   9. Free Press Release Another American company. They provide a great service of free online PRs.   10. PR (Yes, it's called PR) They don’t specialise with just PRs. Business listings and job search is also in their area of mastery. Prices for PRs are cheap compared to others listed above.   Choosing the right company to join for publications of your PRs is important. Take note of their reputation, specialities, targeted influences and price. Make sure that the PR is newsworthy, properly labelled and aimed at sending a message to avoid disappointment from either having your PR edited or not having your PR published. PRs aren’t cheap if made frequently but as the saying goes, “there’s no such thing as a free lunch”.

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