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"It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair, we had everything before us, we had nothing before us, we were all going direct to Heaven, we were all going direct the other way.”  – Charles Dickens, 1859 These words were written almost 150 years ago.    But if I don’t know where it came from, I would think it could be describing today’s digital world.    We are in the middle of the biggest technological revolution that the world has ever seen.   Some of the changes that are happening to the human animal are breathtaking.   But, like all revolutions, you have to stand outside this one to see exactly what is happening.   From inside, the large-scale changes are incremental and barely visible.  We get caught up in the hype and the wonderment of the next best thing:  a new app, a wristwatch phone, a 3-D printer.  Those bright shiny things mesmerise us and confuse us. From outside, the changes are huge.   As more and more of our information moves online, we become more efficient and interconnected—but also more vulnerable to anyone who wants to take that information from us.  This conflict, between technological innovators and opportunists who take advantage of their inventions, is changing the world. People revere figures, like Steve Jobs, who saw the opportunities that abound in our new digital world, made their mark and changed the course of history.   We know their names.   But there are also innovators we don’t know about—like the cyber criminal who invents a new virus, a new phishing method or a new way of getting past your antivirus software.  These unknown minds are having just as much of an effect on modern life as people like Jobs. Like all revolutions, it is the bystander that gets caught up in the war—the constant war between good and bad.    The digital world is dangerous, and we are constantly under attack.   We build better defences to protect ourselves, while the criminals build better attack weapons.   Where will it stop?   We are stuck in a Cold War-type situation, each side building a better widget to create havoc against the opposition.  No matter how much money and effort we pour into new technology, neither side pulls ahead. But it’s not a fair fight.   Like all revolutions, there are innocent bystanders out in the middle.  The uneducated, innocent and ill-informed users of this bright shiny digital world are the main target of both sides of the fence.   Of course, they will be targeted by cyber criminals—anyone who doesn’t understand the dangers is a prime target for hackers and identity thieves.  But they are also targets for the “good guys,” whether they’re selling apps or the chance to join a website “for free” (at the cost of all your personal information, right down to your great-grandmother’s maiden name.)  The problem with the internet is that, to coin a phrase, "it's where the money is."   This is on both sides of the revolution.    Understanding the criminals is easy; they just want your money, your intellectual property and any information you have about other people.   At least you know where you stand and you can learn how to protect yourself.    The other side of the conflict is less black and white. There are multi-national organisations who will sell us the next best widget, and they don’t benefit from telling us that we don’t really need it. I understand marketing and the need to make a profit.  But when it comes to technology, there has to be a better way.  Before  buying that smart device, putting those documents on the cloud or signing up for yet another social networking account, customers should remember that the age of information is also the age of foolishness.  

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(SEO) Safety First - Why you should switch to HTTPS

​             In 2014, Google announced on its Webmaster Blog that it would be using HTTPS as a ranking factor in response to user demands for increased online security. This means that if you want to rank as highly as possible in Google searches, you really should be moving your website from HTTP to HTTPS. Here we take a look at what HTTPS is, how to switch, and what it could mean for your business. What is HTTPS? HTTPS stands for Hyper Text Transfer Protocol Secure. It is the more secure version of HTTP, which is the protocol used to send information between your website and your browser. It offers increased security to users on the pages of your website where they have to share personal information, such as credit card details. It does this by making sure that all information sent between your browser and your server is encrypted, so that even if a hacker manages to intercept the system, they are unable to decrypt the information, rendering it useless to them. HTTPS as an SEO ranking factor           Google has been taking security into account as an SEO ranking factor since 2014, as it wants to promote sites that users can have confidence in. Whilst it seems that the effect of switching to HTTPS plays only a small factor in ranking signals at the moment, you can be sure that over time it’s going to become a pretty important part of a site’s trust factor which will be given preference in the SERPs. Site’s that take personal information (not just ecommerce, but if you have lead gen forms where you take people’s details) are encouraged to make this switch a priority. Non-HTTPS sites to be flagged as “unsafe”                 Currently, sites using HTTPS are preceded by a green padlock icon in the address bar. This is a symbol used by all the main browsers including Google Chrome, Internet Explorer, and Firefox, that your website is deemed “safe”. However, Google Chrome is about to go one step further, by flagging sites that are not using HTTPS with a red “x” above a padlock icon. The aim of this is to warn users that the site they are entering offers no security for their personal information. How to switch from HTTP to HTTPS 1. Purchase an SSL certificate SSL stands for Secure Socket Layer and is the protocol that HTTPS uses to encrypt the information between your website and your server. These can often be purchased from the company that hosts your website. There are three basic kinds of SSL certificates: Extended Validation (EV) – this is used by sites where security is paramount, such as banks and social networks, where a lot of personal information is collected. It’s the best choice for eCommerce sites. Organisation Validation (OV) – this verifies that your site is recognised as legal and legitimate. It is suitable for use by eCommerce sites and sites that collect personal information. Domain Validation (DV) – this is the most affordable option, but offers the least protection. It is suitable for sites that don’t collect personal information at all. Your SSL certificate will then need to be installed on your website’s hosting account. 2. Update all the links on your website. Every link on your website will need to be changed from HTTP to HTTPS, including all your URLs and metadata fields. This can be a lengthy process, so it’s a good idea to use some form of automation such as this tool from WordPress. 3. Set up 301 Redirects 301 Redirects notify search engines that your site’s address has changed from HTTP to HTTPS. They also automatically redirect users who have previously bookmarked a page on your site to the new, more secure version after you flip the switch. Taking these three steps may seem like more trouble than it’s worth at present. However, get it right and you could see vastly increased benefits in the near future. If you want help on getting an SSL certificate for your website, you can contact Digital Meal to implement it for you.

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10 most common excuses heard from end users

In the business world, people seem to find the most bizarre reasons for calling the ICT department.  Here is a list of ten that always seem to pop up when least expected.  Some of the responses below are things I would never say aloud—but that doesn't mean I'm not thinking them.   That password is too hard to remember!   Few people realize that the passwords you use when accessing bank accounts, business systems and web-based email are, in fact, your signature.  It's not a good idea to have a signature any stranger can imitate by guessing.  That is why it's important to have a complicated password using numbers, letters, capitals and symbols.  The problem is picking one that is easy to remember.  Here are two ways to do that:  Use a phrase as your password (IhatePasswords!), or use two words separated by a number or symbol (tree56Watch).   I only had that problem after you worked on my computer!   As computer technicians we often get this.  Fifty to 70 percent of the time, this comment is made days after the initial work was completed.  Of course, the user may have been downloading free music and software or clicking on spam emails—but because the technician was there a week ago, they must have created the problem.   The anti-virus is not working!   Let’s come to an understanding.  Anti-virus software is only as good as its latest update.  An AV program will stop 95 percent of viruses in the wild.  But they are always playing catch-up—an AV program is a reactive method of protection, and there will always be a gap between existing attack vectors and the updates that allow a system to block them.  That gap can be as little as one hour, or as long as 14 days.  Viruses will always find a way of getting past the AV, which is what they are designed to do.  The only way to protect yourself is to be ever vigilant.  A little paranoia also helps.   But that’s your job!   Said in reference to tasks like emptying the recycle bin, moving unnecessary items off the desktop, and clearing out the deleted items folder of your e-mail.  Good computer housekeeping is not the role of the computer technician.  The computer technician doesn't know the difference between unwanted spam, and that absolutely crucial e-mail that you put in the trash folder by accident.   But this computer isn't very old!   Computers have a useful lifespan of about two to three years.  After about two years, they start to slow down.  This in mainly due to the fact that they have two years of accumulated crap inside their system.  They also start to have problems with old hardware trying to get the most out of new software.  For similar reasons, smart devices have a lifespan of about twelve to eighteen months.  In most situations, an old computer can benefit from a reinstallation of the operating system.  But your computer may, in fact, be getting old—even if you feel like you just bought it yesterday.   No one else has this problem   Most organizations have something called a "Standard Operating Environment" (SOE).  The SOE consists of the operating system, hardware, software and utilities, including drivers and printers, that will be used by everyone in the business.  The SOE is applied to all the computers within the organization, but there will always be users who have slightly different requirements.  They need to print to a different printer, or they have to use high-end CAD applications.  So there may be a good reason why no one else has your problem.  When someone says this to an ICT person, the best solution is to reimage the computer—in other words, delete every piece of software and start over.  This does not go down well with the user.   I know a little about computers...   The user who has possesses a solid grounding in computer science and a profound appreciation for the inner workings of computers is usually the person a computer technician has the most problems with.  Not because that they have that information—but because they really don't.  When they have a problem, it's usually because they have (here's a technical word for you) “fiddled” with something they didn't understand.  In most cases, because they did not have full access to the system, this is what breaks.    These are also the type of people who will bring in a wireless access point and plug it into the network, because they know better then the technician who set up the network in the first place.  They don't understand the repercussions of an unauthorized and insecure AP on the business network.   What is a web browser?   This is the other end of the spectrum.  Users who have no understanding of the technology that they are using can also be a major problem.  They are the ones who will accidentally click on that link in the phishing email, or download that “fun” free program that auto-installs its own toolbar.  There's hope for these people, but they probably need some type of training, especially in the arena of security.    I never visit that type of website!   Although this may sound like a fishy excuse, in many cases it's true.  The user has been redirected to that embarrassing site in one of two ways.  They went to a site because they were looking for free stuff—applications, movies, songs or pictures of celebrities—and fell into a well-concealed cyber crime plan.  Or they went to a legitimate site that has been compromised by a hacker to redirect all people to the illegitimate page.  Whether the excuse is true or false, this user should stand to use a bit more caution.   I didn't do anything!   No—they didn't click fifteen times on that icon because they just knew the fifteenth click was going to make it work.  It must have been someone else.  And now their computer is frozen because they have fifteen copies of the application open, and not enough resources to do anything about it.  Computers are inanimate objects—they do not plan to be annoying, and they are not out to get you.  If things are going a tad slowly for your liking, taking your irritation out on your keyboard won't fix it.  And when it comes to real computer problems, they're usually due to an error between screen and chair—we call it an ID ten T error (ID10T).   There are many computer technicians out there who have similar stories to tell.  Let's all commiserate by sharing them.

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10 things every small-business website needs

There are many other elements besides how your website looks that go into making it customer-friendly, something that inspires them to actually do business with you. 1. A clear description of who you are Someone who visit your website know exactly what is that you do. That means clearly stating your name and summing up your products or services right on the homepage. Tell people this is the right website that they have been searching for, a clear description will attract the visitor's attention immediately within 2-3 seconds, and encourage them to stay on your website longer. 2. A simple, sensible Web address Don't make things complicated. Your domain name is like your brand. It should be easy for a user to type it into a Web browser or an e-mail address and it is recommended using the .com domain as users are conditioned to type that extension when they enter a Web address. For non-profits or organizations, it is recommended using a .org domain for branding purposes, but also have a .com version of the domain in case a user accidentally types the .com address. Avoid using dashes (which can cause SEO headaches) and numbers (which can cause confusion for customers). 3. An easily-navigated site map Clear links to the most important pages, and a site map, are crucial for guiding visitors to the information they're looking for. Be sure your navigation is clearly laid out. Recommended using drop downs in the navigation menu so the visitor can see the content under every heading from virtually any page. You want to make it very easy for your visitors to find what they are looking for, or what you want them to know. The best place for the contact information is the top left or top right corner of the home page. It is also a good practice to include contact information in every page of the website in the footer or side bar or even in top right corner, which helps the visitors to find it more easily. 4. Easy-to-find contact information You wouldn't want to lose a customer to a competitor just because you made it difficult for them to get in touch with you. Not every online visitor has the patience to click through every page on your website to find the contact information. You should also be sure to include several ways for them to contact you -- phone, e-mail, and a standard contact form, are all good options. It is also suggested to including your address, and even a link to your location in Google maps. One of the biggest mistakes business owners make is to force only one way to reach them. The point is to make it very easy for users to communicate with you on their terms. 5. Customer testimonials Honest words from others help make your products or services more tangible to customers who are visiting you online. They help your potential customers to build trust in you, especially if you are new. And they help shoppers to confirm whether the product or services meet their needs. People love to hear stories from real people, they help people find out other things you haven't said on your website. 6. An obvious call to action Tell the online visitors literally what you want them to do with clear tones of commend. For instance, you may want them to call you now for free quote, or sign up to your exclusively online coupons, or add products to the online shopping cart, etc. And call attention to your suggestion -- by using special buttons or highlighting the text, for example. 7. Know the basics of SEO Your website won't do you as much good if no one can find it. Become familiar with the SEO basics to make it more accessible by search engine. You don't need to employ mysterious, ninja, black hat SEO types to rank well on the search engines. Simply make sure your website is coded correctly. That means using the correct keywords throughout your text, putting in plenty of links, naming your page titles and URLs correctly, and employing the magic of images and videos. 8. Fresh, quality content For many businesses, your website is your first impression on a customer. You want to give them what they're looking for, and perhaps even give them a reason to keep coming back. The user is looking for something. Make sure you give it to them and be sure your content is original, well written and valuable. Fresh content is a gold mine for SEO, as well. You can keep your content from getting stale and give your company some personality, too by incorporating a regularly-updated blog or connecting in your social media feeds. 9. A secure hosting platform Having your online information hijacked is a nightmare, and, should it happen to your business, it could cost you customers. It is imperative that you have a secure, trustworthy hosting company to keep the bad guys out and your content up and running. It is also very important to keep your content management system updated in order to stay one step ahead of the hackers. 10. A design and style that's friendly to online readers Online visitors often scan through a Web page to sample the content first when they open a new Web page. If they feel like they are on the right page, they will slow down to read the full story. To enhance user's experience on your small business website, you need to organize the content for scanning. He recommends three style points for online writing to keep in mind: - Break things down into short paragraphs, with headers if necessary - Use bullet points - Highlight important words or phrases. In the end, simplicity and basic colors are the best bet. Again, the content is the focus, not the pretty image at the top of the page.   

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3 Reasons Why MYOB is Not a Cloud Accounting Firm....Yet

Allow me to tell you a story of the first and last time I explored MYOB's “online” accounting solutions. A new client had just come on board using AccountRight Live which has just upgraded to from Essentials, so I went to myob.com.au on my MacBook to log in. I was looking forward to getting up to speed on AccountRight Live and proving to those people who said MYOB is being left behind wrong. MYOB was the largest accounting software provider in Australia and the merits of Cloud Computing were obvious so they surely couldn't be that bad --I thought. When I clicked on the log-in button however, I was given 7 product log-in options, none being AccountRight Live. Confused, I spent some time navigating their home page only to realise that I would have to figure out which AccountRight Live software package to download in orderto actually use the file. Reason 1: AccountRight Live -- an "Online Solution" by definition should not require a download. Fair enough I thought. If I have to download something I will.  Noticing the “Need Software for a Mac, Find out more about AccountEdge" line, I clicked through to be greeted with the cheery message that I would have to pay $1,099 for the privilege of using this "online solution" on my Mac. Still working off the presumption that this was a cloud accounting package, I thought, ”This can’t be right, I am missing something here.” So I eagerly headed to the Help section of the site in search of the FAQs. 30 minutes later, deep in post after post on the detailed MYOB community, I was no better off so I gave up and reached for the phone for someone to talk to. After another 30 minutes navigating an automated answering machine and being on hold, I finally got through to someone. Reason 2: I am not willing to spend this sort of time waiting to talk to someone about an issue. Prompt Accessibility is a must and it is standard with Xero and Quickbooks online in my experience. To my amazement not only was I was told that I would indeed have to download software to use AccountRight Live, but I wasn’t going to be able to access the file on my Mac anyway, as this file would only work on Windows machines. Reason 3: A software company that doesn't allow your files to be accessed by its own software on different operating system is crazy. I was not pleased. I had to take 2 hours out of an already busy day to find out that not only did you have to download software to use their ‘online solution’, I actually couldn’t ever access my clients file because I used an Apple MacBook. Common sense would tell you that MYOB cannot hope to continue in this vein if they want to seriously compete with the other cloud accounting players. So I have to believe that they will improve, if haven’t already. However, the ball is definitely in their court, as I won’t be spending any more of my time finding out. P.S. I refuse to believe that I really can’t use an Account Right Live file on my Macbook via AccountEdge (it’s essentially the same software made by the same company!), so if the support person was wrong about this, or I got the wrong impression, please do let me know.  

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4 Design Elements You Hate, But They Work

There are cases when the taste of you as a designer and the one of your client don't coincide Find out tips about what elements to use to make this work Learn how "click here", "home" button, "search box" and other factors should be used to work best  If you've ever created a website for someone else, you've had to go through that painful process where the client submits edits that you feel are unnecessary, ugly, or just heart-breaking. You think to yourself, "Design is King," and wonder why the client can't understand that your original comp doesn't need any editing. But before you write off your client as a design-ignorant troglodyte, perhaps you should consider that there are many elements that you may hate, but they actually "work"... Click Here to Continue Personally, I've never liked a design that tells a visitor exactly what to do. "They're not that dumb, are they?" I reason. So the classic "Click Here to _______" is a particularly annoying phrase to me, and I usually try to use a less ubiquitous phrase like "Read Article" or "Learn More about Troglodytes." However, the fact is, the "Click Here" phrase actually performs better than other expressions as indicated in a September Marketing Sherpa study (some stats from the study can be found by clicking here). The Home Button Since space is a luxury in website design, most designers leave out the "Home" button on the menu (myself included). Instead, we take advantage of the website's logo, usually in the top left, and link that to the home page - after all, that is an accepted Internet convention. For example, Flash FX website has done away with Home Page Button rather they have hyperlinked the logo with the website URL to facilitate the navigation process. But although many people know they need to click the logo to return to the home page (and you should link it that way), there are still many users who don't realize this. I worked for a company a little while back, and during user testing, we found that only half of the users (namely users who used the Internet a lot) knew that the logo would get them back to the homepage. Furthermore, many users did want to get back to the home page, usually remembering some link or offer that they wanted to check out.  Where's the Search Box? Everyone has a different "starting point" when it comes to a web design. Most start with the logo and header and go from there. Usually, the content is plugged in last along with "peripherals" like ad space and a search box. Unfortunately, if your website is content-driven or retail-oriented, it is the search box that needs to be preeminent in your design. We live in a world where people expect to search quickly and effectively for whatever they want. In fact, if your website is in one of the categories above and you do have a search box, I can almost guarantee (from personal experience tracking traffic on such sites) that the search box is the most used "area" for new visitors, with your menu probably second. So, make sure you focus on these and don't tuck them away because they "don't really fit in your design." (And yes, I do need to add search functionality to this site :-) Make "It" More Obvious This directive has a variety of incarnations: Make the Text Bigger, Add a Starburst, Use Brighter Colors. Now before you double-over in pain at the previous suggestions, remember that sometimes, the client does know more about his audience than you. Often, after a client tells me that 8pt text is too small, I will show the design to other non-designers and they'll agree with the client (!!!). I'm not saying the client's design sense exceeds yours, but you need to be willing to compromise and still make your design look good. Remember, you are trying to communicate to the client's audience, not other designers. On my Free Stuff page, you will notice I resorted to the shameless gradient starburst. Not because I think it's a great design, but because it really does work well. Making something more obvious is not always bad... In summary, anyone creating websites needs to remember that a website which accomplishes a client's goals is more important than a website that makes a good exhibit. Hopefully, you can make it both functional and beautiful; just remember not to "write off" the above elements, no matter how much you hate them. 

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5 HTML Tags That Every Blogger Should Know

As a blogger, you'll have infinite many options when it comes to your choice of blog portal and publishing tools. It also means that the technical bits often differ between bloggers. Solutions that work on a blog may not work on another. But is it something that most people have in common, so is the use of HTML on the blog. Therefore, we have compiled a list of 5 HTML tags that may be helpful to know. Do not miss the list at the end, full of good websites where you can learn more about HTML! Bold style with <strong> Using HTML tags to form text is one of the most basic things you can do with HTML. Therefore, it's a good idea to start this list with. Fat style can be very useful when you want to highlight something in your blog posts.  To make a part of the text in your posts in bold, place the text within a start and end. Just as in the example below: <strong>Your  bolded test</strong> Strong in the example above tells us that we want to use our bold style.  To be strong within these <> means that oily still starts there. With the help of / we say that bold style ends there. Links with <a href=""> In the vast majority of blogging tools you can create links by clicking a button. But if that feature were tough, it's always good to be able to fall back on honorable old knowledge. Because it's actually HTML code generated when you click that button and paste the link.  If we compare with bold style, there's more to keep track of this HTML tag. You both need to paste the URL itself and write a link text, that is, the text that the reader clicks to follow the link. This is how the code itself looks like: <a href="Link URL">Link text</a> If we fill in it with all the necessary information we have quit: <a href="https://www.savvysme.com.au/"> Better Bloggers</a> Headings with <h2> When writing a blog post, it may be good to use headlines for several reasons. Then I do not mean the title of the actual post, but subheadings in the post.  Subheadings are so good that they help make the posts more readable to your readers. But then they are also good when you want SEO-customize your posts. Headlines tell the search engines what the post is about, which facilitates indexing of your posts and contributes to a higher ranking among search results. There are several HTML tags for tagging headers, as they usually come in several different sizes. <h1> is used only in the title of the post (and is usually included in the theme) and should not be used in the actual post. Here's why it's an example of the biggest headline: <h2>Your heading</h2> H stands for heading and 2 shows that we want the largest heading to be used in our posts. If we want a smaller title, we can replace the two with a higher figure. 1-5 tend to be available, but it varies between different blog designs. Here you can test yourself, and if they look crazy you may need to change the attributes of your headlines in your CSS file. Use <br /> Have you agreed that you would need some extra space between the text in your post and the image? Then it's the HTML tag <br />you need!  Br stands for line break and gives you a new line when you need it. Unlike when you use links, you do not need a separate end tag. You just throw in <br /> where you want a line break. Lists with <li> and <ul> Lists are good for the same reason as bold may be good. This makes it easier for the reader to make the text more transparent. To list your blog posts, you need to know two HTML tags: UL and LI Ul talks about what kind of list you want to use, and where it starts and ends. UL stands for Unordered List, ie you want to create a list of dots rather than numbers.  LI speaks as when a point in the list begins and ends. It becomes clearer when you see it in action. So we run an example! <ul> <li>Point 1</li> <li>Point 2</li> </ul>

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5 Reasons Why You Need a Business Website

The importance of having a business website: not to lose a single customer is our main task!  Why do customers trust only those companies that have websites?  How can you save money by just creating a website? Is it possible?  In today’s ever-evolving digital marketing world, running a business be it small or big is no easy task. As a small business owner, if you don't have a secure website, you are losing your customers to your competition. A website is now a necessity for business, and six out of ten customers expect brands to have one. Customers come to your site to find information about your business - the deciding factor in whether or not they will choose your product or service. Your business website is the centre of your company's online presence. Meaning, a website is an important aspect that can enhance your online presence by providing your customers information at the click of a button. By not having a site, you are taking the risk of your customers not knowing how to reach you. So, why to wait longer, your customers are looking for you already! Here are five reasons that will leave you wondering why didn't you step into the online world sooner! Here is why you need a business website? Your Website is Your Business’s Credibility - The First Impression Let's face it - we live in a world where just having an online presence can give your business more credibility. Your website is the first impression for your business. Customers trust companies that have an online presence. They read online reviews about the brand and its customer service. Look at it this way. Suppose you want to book a hotel in a particular location. What do you do? Search for reviews online - Right? So, if you have a website, people will find you more credible. Otherwise, they're likely to dismiss you entirely. You don't need a great website. All you need is a site that is easy-to-use where your customers can find details about your business. Stay in Touch with Your Customer- Anyone, Anywhere & Anytime A website is a promise that your business is available, 365 days a year to your customer, regardless of you are available or not. Your site is the most cost-effective way to tell your audience about your product or services. Provide a contact form where he can quickly reach you in case of any queries. So as long as you have a website regardless of you’re in front of a computer or not, your business is always open! No Website Meaning Your Local Audience Don’t Know About You Of course, a website has its own cost - but it’s worth it! Look at it this way, how will your customers know about your business if you don't have a website. Most of the people searching for the products or services related to your business are the people in your neighbourhood. And, if all your competitors have a business meaning, you're losing your business to your competition. Think about it this way - between you and your competitor (who has a business website) whom do you think your customers would reach out? Create a website that is optimized for local visibility. Create content that may interest your local audience with keywords relevant to your business. It will help you to attract potential customers and retain them. A Website that Syncs with Your Social Media Channels Social media marketing can expand your business network and help you to target your local audience directly. By automating social media marketing, you can seamlessly integrate your website with different social media platforms using a set of APIs. You can manage all your social channels with a single dashboard and analyze the performance of each post. You are essentially saving time by not having to log in to multiple social media accounts with different credentials. With tight integration between your website and social media, you can connect directly with your customers and empower your business. You can easily share and publish a post without manually going to different platforms. Website Can Save You A Lot of Money How? You have a virtual space for your business. Meaning? You no longer have to invest in physical premises, staff, tax and utility bills. Essentially - it says, your business is available to everyone using the Internet. All you need to do is create a Search Engine Optimized website.

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