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Brian Mallyon

Owner at Luckypole Limited

Member Since May 2013

Hong Kong,

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Owner of Hong Kong based product Sourcing company

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Brian Mallyon answered this question

What is branding?

For me, branding, as it relates to business is entirely a matter of how I/my company is perceived by my customer.My name, my logo etc. can be branded onto a product or a letterhead to show my name, but it is what my company does, and how it does it, that is the brand.I know it is relevant to larger companies, but, despite people who design logos telling me they are important, I am still not convinced they are as important for small companies. Can't recall anyone ever telling me they saw my company logo and decided to make contact.Likewise, there is a comment above about branding for Nike vs Adidas. I wouldn't have a clue what the culture or purpose is of either, or how one differs from the other, I tend to buy Adidas because they fit my feet better. There is no message that makes me prefer one over the other for anything other than practical reasons, and I have bought both brandnames. It then becomes an issue of whether I am the target market for either Nike or Adidas and hiow they respond to me. And you know when your branding is working because instead of someone saying they are off to buy a pair of shoes, they say, I am off to get some new Nike's/Addidas, or instead of buying a phone, they are off to get the latest iPhone.

Brian Mallyon answered this question

Would you advertise in LinkedIn or is it just sharing knowledge?

I use LI as a tool to locate potential people who I consider appropriate to network with and form business relationships with.For me, advertising on there doesn't do that, simply because I see it as a networking site rather one of "selling". As with Steven, I have never clicked.on an ad.Every new customer I have got from LinkedIn has been through contact, discussion, imparting knowledge etc. All things that consisted of personal time and effort, rather than placing an ad.And, although I am including my experiences only, I have found that the more time and effort the better the reward. As soon as I slacken off, so does any result, sometimes significantly.

Brian Mallyon answered this question

Could we see the end of Made in China in the future?

I think it is important to look further than the headlines. China's economy is changing, but not necessarily as a manufacturer. Stats. I have seen usually show that manufacturing goes through cycles of surges and declines depending on a whole range of things like seasonal aspects as well as the state of the world economy. Amongst those surges when times are good China generally rallies faster and when times are bad China generally slows off slower.What may be in place is that more labour intensive industries such as those in textiles are moving away due to higher wages, whereas China is aiming for more advanced manufacturing.I reckon China will still be THE worlds manufacturer for a long while yet.

Brian Mallyon answered this question

Ling Lee
Ling Lee, at Digital Marketing and Personal Branding

Product Development

Is there an australian version of Alibaba website for products?

I am not sure of an Australian version of Alibaba, but if you google "Australian made" I believe there are several websites that provide details of at least some Australian made products.

Brian Mallyon answered this question

Ling Lee
Ling Lee, at Digital Marketing and Personal Branding

Importing

What were your experiences with wholesale buying from India or China?

I am starting to write a series of articles about sourcing from China specifically. The below link will lead you to them. Hope something there may help.

 

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/article/20140826062235-169973897-global-product-sourcing-due-diligence?trk=mp-reader-card

 

 

Brian Mallyon answered this question

Ilga Horvat
Ilga Horvat, Operations Manager at Hornet Import and Export Group Pty Ltd

Importing

Is the growing trend of offshore manufacturing good or bad for Australian SMEs?

Hi Ilga,

For all the people that say off shore manufacturing is bad and that it would be better to bring it back, you never actually hear of anyone who would be prepared to ditch their current job and salary for a chance of working on a factory production line.

Manufacturing is not where the money is made. Take any product and look at each component of getting it from the factory to the end consumer. Factory makes a small amount and the much larger slice of the pie goes to the logistics company, the company that advertises the product, the brand owner and the retailer. All theses are effectively service industries and that's where the higher incomes are.

It's only in relatively recent history that small Australian businesses have started venturing overseas themselves to buy their products. Previously they just bought from local wholesalers who offered limited stock in limited colours at sometimes considerably marked up prices.

If you are a small business with limited capacity for a three+ month turnaround of products and quantities are only small, it may still be better for you to buy locally.

But I think any business needs to be constantly looking at their model for supply of products, and looking at the options available, even to just see what are the best options for the business on an individual basis.

It's also not that long ago that buying offshore meant buying large quantities. That is not always the case now and there is more scope to buy in smaller lots, but whether you have the expertise and ability,and whether it will be worthwhile will still depend on individual circumstances.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Brian Mallyon answered this question

Why do Australian startups fail?

Two things strike me about the comments above.

1. They are probably more reasons why startups don't start in the first place rather than the reasons they fail.

2. They apportion blame to possible outside influences.

Some of those things may be factors, but a well researched startup already knows about the support available, it knows the size of the potential market and it knows the cost of doing business.

And if they haven't considered these factors, then perhaps more of the blame for failures rests with the startup for not doing adequate preparation to weigh up the potential of the business.

 

 

 

 

 

Business Management

How to Lower Costs with Product Sourcing Overseas

Most small businesses are doing it tough. This is not only due to worldwide economic conditions, but also because Australia is near the very top of the list of most expensive countries to do business, with high costs including taxation, and a high level of living standards. Not only that, but there is a lot of competition within what is really a very small market. The two obvious ways of maximis...

Business Management

How to Lower Costs with Product Sourcing Overseas

Most small businesses are doing it tough. This is not only due to worldwide economic conditions, but also because Australia is near the very top of the list of most expensive countries to do business, with high costs including taxation, and a high level of living standards. Not only that, but there is a lot of competition within what is really a very small market. The two obvious ways of maximis...

Brian Mallyon answered this question

What is branding?

For me, branding, as it relates to business is entirely a matter of how I/my company is perceived by my customer.My name, my logo etc. can be branded onto a product or a letterhead to show my name, but it is what my company does, and how it does it, that is the brand.I know it is relevant to larger companies, but, despite people who design logos telling me they are important, I am still not convinced they are as important for small companies. Can't recall anyone ever telling me they saw my company logo and decided to make contact.Likewise, there is a comment above about branding for Nike vs Adidas. I wouldn't have a clue what the culture or purpose is of either, or how one differs from the other, I tend to buy Adidas because they fit my feet better. There is no message that makes me prefer one over the other for anything other than practical reasons, and I have bought both brandnames. It then becomes an issue of whether I am the target market for either Nike or Adidas and hiow they respond to me. And you know when your branding is working because instead of someone saying they are off to buy a pair of shoes, they say, I am off to get some new Nike's/Addidas, or instead of buying a phone, they are off to get the latest iPhone.

Brian Mallyon answered this question

Would you advertise in LinkedIn or is it just sharing knowledge?

I use LI as a tool to locate potential people who I consider appropriate to network with and form business relationships with.For me, advertising on there doesn't do that, simply because I see it as a networking site rather one of "selling". As with Steven, I have never clicked.on an ad.Every new customer I have got from LinkedIn has been through contact, discussion, imparting knowledge etc. All things that consisted of personal time and effort, rather than placing an ad.And, although I am including my experiences only, I have found that the more time and effort the better the reward. As soon as I slacken off, so does any result, sometimes significantly.

Brian Mallyon answered this question

Could we see the end of Made in China in the future?

I think it is important to look further than the headlines. China's economy is changing, but not necessarily as a manufacturer. Stats. I have seen usually show that manufacturing goes through cycles of surges and declines depending on a whole range of things like seasonal aspects as well as the state of the world economy. Amongst those surges when times are good China generally rallies faster and when times are bad China generally slows off slower.What may be in place is that more labour intensive industries such as those in textiles are moving away due to higher wages, whereas China is aiming for more advanced manufacturing.I reckon China will still be THE worlds manufacturer for a long while yet.

Brian Mallyon answered this question

Ling Lee
Ling Lee, at Digital Marketing and Personal Branding

Product Development

Is there an australian version of Alibaba website for products?

I am not sure of an Australian version of Alibaba, but if you google "Australian made" I believe there are several websites that provide details of at least some Australian made products.

Brian Mallyon answered this question

Ling Lee
Ling Lee, at Digital Marketing and Personal Branding

Importing

What were your experiences with wholesale buying from India or China?

I am starting to write a series of articles about sourcing from China specifically. The below link will lead you to them. Hope something there may help.

 

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/article/20140826062235-169973897-global-product-sourcing-due-diligence?trk=mp-reader-card

 

 

Brian Mallyon answered this question

Ilga Horvat
Ilga Horvat, Operations Manager at Hornet Import and Export Group Pty Ltd

Importing

Is the growing trend of offshore manufacturing good or bad for Australian SMEs?

Hi Ilga,

For all the people that say off shore manufacturing is bad and that it would be better to bring it back, you never actually hear of anyone who would be prepared to ditch their current job and salary for a chance of working on a factory production line.

Manufacturing is not where the money is made. Take any product and look at each component of getting it from the factory to the end consumer. Factory makes a small amount and the much larger slice of the pie goes to the logistics company, the company that advertises the product, the brand owner and the retailer. All theses are effectively service industries and that's where the higher incomes are.

It's only in relatively recent history that small Australian businesses have started venturing overseas themselves to buy their products. Previously they just bought from local wholesalers who offered limited stock in limited colours at sometimes considerably marked up prices.

If you are a small business with limited capacity for a three+ month turnaround of products and quantities are only small, it may still be better for you to buy locally.

But I think any business needs to be constantly looking at their model for supply of products, and looking at the options available, even to just see what are the best options for the business on an individual basis.

It's also not that long ago that buying offshore meant buying large quantities. That is not always the case now and there is more scope to buy in smaller lots, but whether you have the expertise and ability,and whether it will be worthwhile will still depend on individual circumstances.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Brian Mallyon answered this question

Why do Australian startups fail?

Two things strike me about the comments above.

1. They are probably more reasons why startups don't start in the first place rather than the reasons they fail.

2. They apportion blame to possible outside influences.

Some of those things may be factors, but a well researched startup already knows about the support available, it knows the size of the potential market and it knows the cost of doing business.

And if they haven't considered these factors, then perhaps more of the blame for failures rests with the startup for not doing adequate preparation to weigh up the potential of the business.