Iain Dooley profile image

Iain Dooley

Owner at

Member Since September 2014

Macmasters Beach, NSW, 2251

SHARE

14 FOLLOWERS

Iain Dooley answered this question

What is your best advice for someone looking to start an online retail store?


I just answered this question here:https://www.savvysme.com.au/question/438-what-are-the-first-steps-to-starting-an-online-store"The first step to starting an online store is to go to AdWords and do keyword research to find out what people are looking for, then use that to choose a niche (see below for link to resources by Andrew Youderian which cover other factors in selecting a niche).You can then put up a very simple page using one of the many free services for doing so, that shows some products. You could, for example, setup a shopify store with some products in it. You then run an AdWords campaign and see if you make some sales. Don't worry if you don't have the ability to fulfil the orders yet, just see if you get some, then write to the customers and apologise that you don't have the item in stock and refund their money.Once you've established how much it costs to make a sale, and whether or not there is sufficient volume for what you're selling, work out suppliers etc.Watch this Mixergy interview that takes you through this process: http://mixergy.com/interviews/jonathan-beekman-man-crates-interview/. If you don't have a Mixergy premium membership already, you should get one so you can watch that interview, but also so you can watch all the other interviews and courses -- it's incredible. The most valuable business resource on the internet by far.Also read everything here: http://www.ecommercefuel.com/resources/"

Iain Dooley answered this question

What are the first steps to starting an online store?


The first step to starting an online store is to go to AdWords and do keyword research to find out what people are looking for, then use that to choose a niche (see below for link to resources by Andrew Youderian which cover other factors in selecting a niche).
You can then put up a very simple page using one of the many free services for doing so, that shows some products. You could, for example, setup a shopify store with some products in it. You then run an AdWords campaign and see if you make some sales. Don't worry if you don't have the ability to fulfil the orders yet, just see if you get some, then write to the customers and apologise that you don't have the item in stock and refund their money.
Once you've established how much it costs to make a sale, and whether or not there is sufficient volume for what you're selling, work out suppliers etc.
Watch this Mixergy interview that takes you through this process: http://mixergy.com/interviews/jonathan-beekman-man-crates-interview/. If you don't have a Mixergy premium membership already, you should get one so you can watch that interview, but also so you can watch all the other interviews and courses -- it's incredible. The most valuable business resource on the internet by far.
Also read everything here:
http://www.ecommercefuel.com/resources/

Iain Dooley answered this question

Ananda Raj Pandey
Ananda Raj Pandey, Developer at SavvySME

Home Based Business

Do I need a registered business name to start a home business?


You just need an ABN and some customers. Get some revenue, then start worrying about all the other stuff :) If you're just getting started, I recommend consuming as much content from http://www.mixergy.com/ as is humanly possible. It costs $200/year to get access to all interviews and is the best money you will ever spend. From there, you will learn about a tonne of other useful entrepreneurs you can learn from -- Andrew has interviewed EVERYBODY, so start with Mixergy, and an ABN... and have fun :)
Also, if you're interested in not going bankrupt, take a look at this article I wrote on why I did: http://successfulmensbusiness.com/2014/11/7-steps-to-guarantee-bankruptcy/

Iain Dooley answered this question

Leah Cortes
Leah Cortes, Owner / Personal Assistant at

Customer Retention

What is the best way to approach prospective clients?


Hey Leah,


The first step is to narrow down who your prospective clients are. And "small business" doesn't cut it ;)


For example, in my software business, I'm interested in small service businesses that have between 2 and 10 staff and more than $2 mil in annual revenue, or professional consultants who generate in excess of $300k/year but have no staff.


In order to target these people I have setup a new brand called The Procedure People
http://www.theprocedurepeople.com/ -- my goal is to identify business owners who have solved their sales problem but are having trouble growing due to lack of infrastructure. When I did some keyword research in Google AdWords, I found people looking for help with "policies & procedures", my hypothesis is that those people are exactly the target market I'm after (or at least a portion of them are).


But without first stating very clearly who my ideal client is, I wouldn't have been able to come up with a creative way to get access to them.


You're running a PA service: who is your ideal customer? Do you want to access solopreneurs (eg. on Flying Solo) or do you want to access professional consultants? What about picking an industry? Can you be particularly helpful to anaesthetists? Accountants? Lawyers? GPs?

Anyway, you get the point: the answer to the question "how should I get in touch with my prospective clients" will depend on who those prospective clients are. Identifying who they are is often more challenging, than trying to find them ;)

Iain Dooley answered this question

What to consider when looking for a business partner or employee?

I agree with Jeff that trust is important... but to me trust is more like an outcome.The important question is: what reliable, early indicators are there that I will likely be able to trust someone?For me, it comes down to 1 core factor:How well do they communicate?Good communication is a signal for so many other good things: it's difficult to communicate well, consistently, and be insincere because you have to keep coming up with ways to lie; it's very easy to see when someone is stalling repeatedly.Good communication entails good listening and independent learning. Someone who communicates well, can articulate questions and frustrations well, they can pinpoint what's causing problems and explain them. A good communicator will listen and process what you say.In short, I've found that if I focus on a person's ability to communicate well, I can get a really good understanding of how well we'll work together long term.

Iain Dooley answered this question

Ling Lee
Ling Lee, at Digital Marketing and Personal Branding

Search Engine Optimisation (SEO)

Is SEO categorised as part of IT or Marketing?

It's an interesting question and I think this is more or less why the term Growth Hacker has come to prominence.Digital marketing of all kinds has so much overlap with Web Development skills that it is sometimes cumbersome to employ a "marketing person" who then has to make a tonne of requests to the IT team in order to get anything done.This problem can be solved in some part by choosing the right tools and platforms. Things like content management, tag management and sophisticated analytics tools, coupled with basic Web scripting and/or solid excel skills will usually allow someone not specifically employed as an IT professional to solve most of their own problems. So I'd say that SEO strategy is definitely a marketing cost, some tactics will require IT resources, but that anyone doing online marketing these days really needs a "growth hacker" skillset unless they're in a big enough organisation that they can be responsible purely for the strategic side of things.

Iain Dooley answered this question

Nick Chernih
Nick Chernih, Founder at LinkBuildSEO

Virtual Assistance

How much does an australian virtual assistant (VA) cost?

Hey Nick, I hire on http://www.hiremymum.com.au/ starting at around $20/hour for a few different roles in my business (not just VAs but also bookkeeping, sales assistants, editorial assistants, marketing assistants).

I posted recently on a little trick I have for dealing with the "red tape" around hiring locally versus getting someone through oDesk or similar: http://www.theprocedurepeople.com/blog/2014/09/24/how-i-hired-a-woman-to-hire-herself/

By hiring someone as a casual/part-time employee who isn't a sub-contractor (with their own company or established business) you can get their time a bit cheaper.

Many of the women I've found on hiremymum.com.au only really want to work 5 - 10 hours per week and value the flexibility I'm able to offer -- it's the perfect way to get started systemising your business without a lot of risk or administrative overhead.

I also recently posted a very "quick n dirty" way to start working with local VAs if you've never done it before: http://www.theprocedurepeople.com/blog/2014/09/25/a-basic-framework-for-creating-your-first-procedure/

Cheers,
Iain

Iain Dooley answered this question

Richard Schembri
Richard Schembri, Entrepreneur - Team Coach and Mentor in Network Marketing at Team Berrygood

Career Planning

What is your backup plan for income?

The dole? Bar work?

I think my backup plan for income is living very frugally. The amount my family and I live on at the moment means I could do just about any job in the world and we'd still be able to manage!

Iain Dooley answered this question

What qualities do you look for in a new employee?

The ability to read and correctly follow instructions, and craft intelligent questions, are basically the only things I look for no matter who I'm hiring.

In fact my induction process is self-selecting in this regard: when I hire someone I send them a page in our online documentation that has all the info they'll need to do their job.

If they can't read through it and start work without asking questions (well, maybe if they're GOOD questions) or -- worst of all -- requesting that we jump on Skype/the phone to "go through things", they're not my kind of employee :)

Iain Dooley answered this question

What are your experiences with outsourcing the development of your digital platform offshore?

Hi Fleur, we've been outsourcing technology work overseas for several years. The experience differs depending on the type of project. I think the most important thing for successful outsourcing is to develop the policies & procedures *in-house* rather than outsourcing to a team and hoping for the best. There are people with success stories of outsourcing to a "company" overseas, but anecdotally I can tell you they're far outweighed by stories of heartbreak and misery.

Basically, if you don't know how to do something (or at least know the basics of how it works), it's going to be very hard for you to consistently get good results when outsourcing. This is the value that a "local expert" can add - either as a consultant or a separate business - when getting your project outsourced.

It's very easy for miscommunication to creep in, and for projects to seem on track when they're completely not on track.

Hiring is hard to get right, but if you put in the yards you can get amazing people who deliver very high quality work consistently.

Iain Dooley answered this question

Has anyone ever found a recruiter that is worth it?

Check out Aussie startup http://www.recruitloop.com.au/

Iain Dooley answered this question

Neil Steggall
Neil Steggall, Partner at Wardour Capital Partners

Research and Innovation

Is near enough good enough for SMEs?

As you mentioned, if you're a neurosurgeon, you have to get it right.

However, I put stuff out all the time that's far from perfect. In fact I sold 90 copies of my AdWords ebook "Your First 3 Months on AdWords" before I "launched" officially and gave people a 17 page, black and white PDF with scratchy sounding videos. The feedback I got was incredible.

I think the question of "is near enough good enough" is very simply answered by looking at the risks of getting it wrong.

How here's the rub: because we're fearful, self conscious creatures, we OVER ESTIMATE the risks of getting things wrong.

We think we have to manage our reputation and everyone will think we're a fraud and a sham and a loser if we present something that's less than perfect to the world.

The reason people strive for perfection in some circumstances is because they're keenly aware of REAL RISKS, and in other cases it's because they're perceiving risks that aren't there.

In the former case, we want them to be perfectionists. In the latter, they can relax: no-one really cares about what you do and if you stuff up everyone will have forgotten by next week :)

Iain Dooley answered this question

Ling Lee
Ling Lee, at Digital Marketing and Personal Branding

Website

How do you start building a website?

If this is the first thing you're building, I would highly recommend making things very simple.

For example: could you simply build a single page website with leadpages or unbounce?

Could you create a basic blog with tumblr?

Could you use a free wordpress theme and free hosting at wordpress.com to start off with?

Combined with free and/or very cheap website builders, you can use something like Wufoo.com to create reasonably complex user interfaces/forms for your "MVP".

As with anything, the "right tool for the job" will depend on what the job is.

You should definitely be thinking minimal though; don't spend any money until you really know how you're going to get that money back.

Quite often "getting a website done" can seem attractive because you feel like you're making progress, but that feeling wears off quickly when you launch your website to a crowd of ZERO visitors.

Iain Dooley answered this question

Wendy Huang
Wendy Huang, Full Time Blogger and YouTuber at A Custom Blog in 4 Minutes

Business Management

Iain Dooley answered this question

Wendy Huang
Wendy Huang, Full Time Blogger and YouTuber at A Custom Blog in 4 Minutes

Graphic Design

Do you do your website design in-house or do you outsource?

We outsource all our work overseas. oDesk has gotten REALLY expensive for good designers because design work is hands down the easiest thing to outsource, so you're competing against cashed up VC funded US startups.

In order to get competitive rates, we've found going to specific job boards in various locations has worked -- we've hired from Domestika in Spain and zip.lv in Latvia, generally looking to pay around the USD $20/hour mark.

The output will always depend on your own "art direction" but some examples of stuff we've done recently are:

https://www.rentingsmart.com/
http://www.decalmarketing.com/ (our own brand)
http://www.theprocedurepeople.com (our own brand)
http://www.streetuniclothing.com/
http://campaigns.noffs.org.au/donate/
 

It takes a bit of effort to find someone that works well with you and your own management style, but I've always found that with the right processes and management in place outsourcing overseas is pretty stress free (it was tougher at the start ;)

Iain Dooley answered this question

What is the difference between a Business Adviser, Coach and Consultant?

Here's how I'd define it based on my experiences with both:

Looking for the perspective of your business, a coach is more strategic and a consultant is more tactical.

The coach can help you decide what you need to do.

The consultant can help you decide how to do it.

A business adviser is someone I'd say who is more involved with the nitty gritty of actual "business" (like shares, structure, laws, M&A, etc. etc. etc.) but then John is a Business Adviser so his definition is probably correct ;)

 

Iain Dooley answered this question

Neil Steggall
Neil Steggall, Partner at Wardour Capital Partners

Leadership

What is the number one skill required to build a successful SME?

THE ABILITY TO SELL.

Hands down. Without exception. If you can sell it, the rest will follow.

Iain Dooley answered this question

Can you recommend good web developers in Sydney?

Get in touch with Bryce at http://donedigital.com.au/ ... even if he can't help you, he'll be able to recommend someone.

Iain Dooley answered this question

How can a virtual assistant help you?

Hi Maria, I love hiring virtually. In fact, I currently have on staff an accounting assistant, sales assistant, 2 editorial assistants and 2 project scheduling assistants.

The key for me has always been to have adequately defined roles, and adequately defined processes.

I think a lot of people expect to hire a VA and have all their problems solved magically, but hiring someone to do a clearly defined role with properly written documentation can dramatically decrease the hassle and risks associated with outsourcing work.

Iain Dooley answered this question

What is your favourite or preferred project management system?

I use *shudder* Basecamp CLASSIC.

I really want to use something else and constantly evaluate various PM systems that come my way, but the one feature that I simply can't do without is the ability to see a calendar with all milestones for all people across all projects.

Everything else is secondary and can be solved with processes or API customisations (albeit cumbersome to do so in places).

I've seen a few "gantt" plugins that purport to sit on top of Trello etc. but haven't had the chance to evaluate any yet ... if anyone else has some war stories or recommendations I'd love to hear them.

Thanks,
Iain

No results found.

Iain Dooley answered this question

What is your best advice for someone looking to start an online retail store?


I just answered this question here:https://www.savvysme.com.au/question/438-what-are-the-first-steps-to-starting-an-online-store"The first step to starting an online store is to go to AdWords and do keyword research to find out what people are looking for, then use that to choose a niche (see below for link to resources by Andrew Youderian which cover other factors in selecting a niche).You can then put up a very simple page using one of the many free services for doing so, that shows some products. You could, for example, setup a shopify store with some products in it. You then run an AdWords campaign and see if you make some sales. Don't worry if you don't have the ability to fulfil the orders yet, just see if you get some, then write to the customers and apologise that you don't have the item in stock and refund their money.Once you've established how much it costs to make a sale, and whether or not there is sufficient volume for what you're selling, work out suppliers etc.Watch this Mixergy interview that takes you through this process: http://mixergy.com/interviews/jonathan-beekman-man-crates-interview/. If you don't have a Mixergy premium membership already, you should get one so you can watch that interview, but also so you can watch all the other interviews and courses -- it's incredible. The most valuable business resource on the internet by far.Also read everything here: http://www.ecommercefuel.com/resources/"

Iain Dooley answered this question

What are the first steps to starting an online store?


The first step to starting an online store is to go to AdWords and do keyword research to find out what people are looking for, then use that to choose a niche (see below for link to resources by Andrew Youderian which cover other factors in selecting a niche).
You can then put up a very simple page using one of the many free services for doing so, that shows some products. You could, for example, setup a shopify store with some products in it. You then run an AdWords campaign and see if you make some sales. Don't worry if you don't have the ability to fulfil the orders yet, just see if you get some, then write to the customers and apologise that you don't have the item in stock and refund their money.
Once you've established how much it costs to make a sale, and whether or not there is sufficient volume for what you're selling, work out suppliers etc.
Watch this Mixergy interview that takes you through this process: http://mixergy.com/interviews/jonathan-beekman-man-crates-interview/. If you don't have a Mixergy premium membership already, you should get one so you can watch that interview, but also so you can watch all the other interviews and courses -- it's incredible. The most valuable business resource on the internet by far.
Also read everything here:
http://www.ecommercefuel.com/resources/

Iain Dooley answered this question

Ananda Raj Pandey
Ananda Raj Pandey, Developer at SavvySME

Home Based Business

Do I need a registered business name to start a home business?


You just need an ABN and some customers. Get some revenue, then start worrying about all the other stuff :) If you're just getting started, I recommend consuming as much content from http://www.mixergy.com/ as is humanly possible. It costs $200/year to get access to all interviews and is the best money you will ever spend. From there, you will learn about a tonne of other useful entrepreneurs you can learn from -- Andrew has interviewed EVERYBODY, so start with Mixergy, and an ABN... and have fun :)
Also, if you're interested in not going bankrupt, take a look at this article I wrote on why I did: http://successfulmensbusiness.com/2014/11/7-steps-to-guarantee-bankruptcy/

Iain Dooley answered this question

Leah Cortes
Leah Cortes, Owner / Personal Assistant at

Customer Retention

What is the best way to approach prospective clients?


Hey Leah,


The first step is to narrow down who your prospective clients are. And "small business" doesn't cut it ;)


For example, in my software business, I'm interested in small service businesses that have between 2 and 10 staff and more than $2 mil in annual revenue, or professional consultants who generate in excess of $300k/year but have no staff.


In order to target these people I have setup a new brand called The Procedure People
http://www.theprocedurepeople.com/ -- my goal is to identify business owners who have solved their sales problem but are having trouble growing due to lack of infrastructure. When I did some keyword research in Google AdWords, I found people looking for help with "policies & procedures", my hypothesis is that those people are exactly the target market I'm after (or at least a portion of them are).


But without first stating very clearly who my ideal client is, I wouldn't have been able to come up with a creative way to get access to them.


You're running a PA service: who is your ideal customer? Do you want to access solopreneurs (eg. on Flying Solo) or do you want to access professional consultants? What about picking an industry? Can you be particularly helpful to anaesthetists? Accountants? Lawyers? GPs?

Anyway, you get the point: the answer to the question "how should I get in touch with my prospective clients" will depend on who those prospective clients are. Identifying who they are is often more challenging, than trying to find them ;)

Iain Dooley answered this question

What to consider when looking for a business partner or employee?

I agree with Jeff that trust is important... but to me trust is more like an outcome.The important question is: what reliable, early indicators are there that I will likely be able to trust someone?For me, it comes down to 1 core factor:How well do they communicate?Good communication is a signal for so many other good things: it's difficult to communicate well, consistently, and be insincere because you have to keep coming up with ways to lie; it's very easy to see when someone is stalling repeatedly.Good communication entails good listening and independent learning. Someone who communicates well, can articulate questions and frustrations well, they can pinpoint what's causing problems and explain them. A good communicator will listen and process what you say.In short, I've found that if I focus on a person's ability to communicate well, I can get a really good understanding of how well we'll work together long term.

Iain Dooley answered this question

Ling Lee
Ling Lee, at Digital Marketing and Personal Branding

Search Engine Optimisation (SEO)

Is SEO categorised as part of IT or Marketing?

It's an interesting question and I think this is more or less why the term Growth Hacker has come to prominence.Digital marketing of all kinds has so much overlap with Web Development skills that it is sometimes cumbersome to employ a "marketing person" who then has to make a tonne of requests to the IT team in order to get anything done.This problem can be solved in some part by choosing the right tools and platforms. Things like content management, tag management and sophisticated analytics tools, coupled with basic Web scripting and/or solid excel skills will usually allow someone not specifically employed as an IT professional to solve most of their own problems. So I'd say that SEO strategy is definitely a marketing cost, some tactics will require IT resources, but that anyone doing online marketing these days really needs a "growth hacker" skillset unless they're in a big enough organisation that they can be responsible purely for the strategic side of things.

Iain Dooley answered this question

Nick Chernih
Nick Chernih, Founder at LinkBuildSEO

Virtual Assistance

How much does an australian virtual assistant (VA) cost?

Hey Nick, I hire on http://www.hiremymum.com.au/ starting at around $20/hour for a few different roles in my business (not just VAs but also bookkeeping, sales assistants, editorial assistants, marketing assistants).

I posted recently on a little trick I have for dealing with the "red tape" around hiring locally versus getting someone through oDesk or similar: http://www.theprocedurepeople.com/blog/2014/09/24/how-i-hired-a-woman-to-hire-herself/

By hiring someone as a casual/part-time employee who isn't a sub-contractor (with their own company or established business) you can get their time a bit cheaper.

Many of the women I've found on hiremymum.com.au only really want to work 5 - 10 hours per week and value the flexibility I'm able to offer -- it's the perfect way to get started systemising your business without a lot of risk or administrative overhead.

I also recently posted a very "quick n dirty" way to start working with local VAs if you've never done it before: http://www.theprocedurepeople.com/blog/2014/09/25/a-basic-framework-for-creating-your-first-procedure/

Cheers,
Iain

Iain Dooley answered this question

Richard Schembri
Richard Schembri, Entrepreneur - Team Coach and Mentor in Network Marketing at Team Berrygood

Career Planning

What is your backup plan for income?

The dole? Bar work?

I think my backup plan for income is living very frugally. The amount my family and I live on at the moment means I could do just about any job in the world and we'd still be able to manage!

Iain Dooley answered this question

What qualities do you look for in a new employee?

The ability to read and correctly follow instructions, and craft intelligent questions, are basically the only things I look for no matter who I'm hiring.

In fact my induction process is self-selecting in this regard: when I hire someone I send them a page in our online documentation that has all the info they'll need to do their job.

If they can't read through it and start work without asking questions (well, maybe if they're GOOD questions) or -- worst of all -- requesting that we jump on Skype/the phone to "go through things", they're not my kind of employee :)

Iain Dooley answered this question

What are your experiences with outsourcing the development of your digital platform offshore?

Hi Fleur, we've been outsourcing technology work overseas for several years. The experience differs depending on the type of project. I think the most important thing for successful outsourcing is to develop the policies & procedures *in-house* rather than outsourcing to a team and hoping for the best. There are people with success stories of outsourcing to a "company" overseas, but anecdotally I can tell you they're far outweighed by stories of heartbreak and misery.

Basically, if you don't know how to do something (or at least know the basics of how it works), it's going to be very hard for you to consistently get good results when outsourcing. This is the value that a "local expert" can add - either as a consultant or a separate business - when getting your project outsourced.

It's very easy for miscommunication to creep in, and for projects to seem on track when they're completely not on track.

Hiring is hard to get right, but if you put in the yards you can get amazing people who deliver very high quality work consistently.

Iain Dooley answered this question

Has anyone ever found a recruiter that is worth it?

Check out Aussie startup http://www.recruitloop.com.au/

Iain Dooley answered this question

Neil Steggall
Neil Steggall, Partner at Wardour Capital Partners

Research and Innovation

Is near enough good enough for SMEs?

As you mentioned, if you're a neurosurgeon, you have to get it right.

However, I put stuff out all the time that's far from perfect. In fact I sold 90 copies of my AdWords ebook "Your First 3 Months on AdWords" before I "launched" officially and gave people a 17 page, black and white PDF with scratchy sounding videos. The feedback I got was incredible.

I think the question of "is near enough good enough" is very simply answered by looking at the risks of getting it wrong.

How here's the rub: because we're fearful, self conscious creatures, we OVER ESTIMATE the risks of getting things wrong.

We think we have to manage our reputation and everyone will think we're a fraud and a sham and a loser if we present something that's less than perfect to the world.

The reason people strive for perfection in some circumstances is because they're keenly aware of REAL RISKS, and in other cases it's because they're perceiving risks that aren't there.

In the former case, we want them to be perfectionists. In the latter, they can relax: no-one really cares about what you do and if you stuff up everyone will have forgotten by next week :)

Iain Dooley answered this question

Ling Lee
Ling Lee, at Digital Marketing and Personal Branding

Website

How do you start building a website?

If this is the first thing you're building, I would highly recommend making things very simple.

For example: could you simply build a single page website with leadpages or unbounce?

Could you create a basic blog with tumblr?

Could you use a free wordpress theme and free hosting at wordpress.com to start off with?

Combined with free and/or very cheap website builders, you can use something like Wufoo.com to create reasonably complex user interfaces/forms for your "MVP".

As with anything, the "right tool for the job" will depend on what the job is.

You should definitely be thinking minimal though; don't spend any money until you really know how you're going to get that money back.

Quite often "getting a website done" can seem attractive because you feel like you're making progress, but that feeling wears off quickly when you launch your website to a crowd of ZERO visitors.

Iain Dooley answered this question

Wendy Huang
Wendy Huang, Full Time Blogger and YouTuber at A Custom Blog in 4 Minutes

Business Management

Iain Dooley answered this question

Wendy Huang
Wendy Huang, Full Time Blogger and YouTuber at A Custom Blog in 4 Minutes

Graphic Design

Do you do your website design in-house or do you outsource?

We outsource all our work overseas. oDesk has gotten REALLY expensive for good designers because design work is hands down the easiest thing to outsource, so you're competing against cashed up VC funded US startups.

In order to get competitive rates, we've found going to specific job boards in various locations has worked -- we've hired from Domestika in Spain and zip.lv in Latvia, generally looking to pay around the USD $20/hour mark.

The output will always depend on your own "art direction" but some examples of stuff we've done recently are:

https://www.rentingsmart.com/
http://www.decalmarketing.com/ (our own brand)
http://www.theprocedurepeople.com (our own brand)
http://www.streetuniclothing.com/
http://campaigns.noffs.org.au/donate/
 

It takes a bit of effort to find someone that works well with you and your own management style, but I've always found that with the right processes and management in place outsourcing overseas is pretty stress free (it was tougher at the start ;)

Iain Dooley answered this question

What is the difference between a Business Adviser, Coach and Consultant?

Here's how I'd define it based on my experiences with both:

Looking for the perspective of your business, a coach is more strategic and a consultant is more tactical.

The coach can help you decide what you need to do.

The consultant can help you decide how to do it.

A business adviser is someone I'd say who is more involved with the nitty gritty of actual "business" (like shares, structure, laws, M&A, etc. etc. etc.) but then John is a Business Adviser so his definition is probably correct ;)

 

Iain Dooley answered this question

Neil Steggall
Neil Steggall, Partner at Wardour Capital Partners

Leadership

What is the number one skill required to build a successful SME?

THE ABILITY TO SELL.

Hands down. Without exception. If you can sell it, the rest will follow.

Iain Dooley answered this question

Can you recommend good web developers in Sydney?

Get in touch with Bryce at http://donedigital.com.au/ ... even if he can't help you, he'll be able to recommend someone.

Iain Dooley answered this question

How can a virtual assistant help you?

Hi Maria, I love hiring virtually. In fact, I currently have on staff an accounting assistant, sales assistant, 2 editorial assistants and 2 project scheduling assistants.

The key for me has always been to have adequately defined roles, and adequately defined processes.

I think a lot of people expect to hire a VA and have all their problems solved magically, but hiring someone to do a clearly defined role with properly written documentation can dramatically decrease the hassle and risks associated with outsourcing work.

Iain Dooley answered this question

What is your favourite or preferred project management system?

I use *shudder* Basecamp CLASSIC.

I really want to use something else and constantly evaluate various PM systems that come my way, but the one feature that I simply can't do without is the ability to see a calendar with all milestones for all people across all projects.

Everything else is secondary and can be solved with processes or API customisations (albeit cumbersome to do so in places).

I've seen a few "gantt" plugins that purport to sit on top of Trello etc. but haven't had the chance to evaluate any yet ... if anyone else has some war stories or recommendations I'd love to hear them.

Thanks,
Iain

TOPICS FOLLOWED

Online Business

Online Business 9334 FOLLOWERS

Sales and Marketing

Sales and Marketing 8727 FOLLOWERS

Information Technology

Information Technology 7685 FOLLOWERS

Startup

Startup 6865 FOLLOWERS

Business Management

Business Management 11128 FOLLOWERS

Ecommerce

Ecommerce 7544 FOLLOWERS

Selling Online

Selling Online 7606 FOLLOWERS

Social Media

Social Media 7686 FOLLOWERS

Web Design

Web Design 7522 FOLLOWERS

Web Development

Web Development 7569 FOLLOWERS

Web Hosting

Web Hosting 7424 FOLLOWERS

Customer Acquisition

Customer Acquisition 6942 FOLLOWERS

Graphic Design

Graphic Design 6870 FOLLOWERS

Video Production

Video Production 6852 FOLLOWERS

Advertising

Advertising 7000 FOLLOWERS

Branding

Branding 7012 FOLLOWERS

Market Research

Market Research 6907 FOLLOWERS

Digital Marketing

Digital Marketing 7065 FOLLOWERS

Public Relations (PR)

Public Relations (PR) 6906 FOLLOWERS

Website

Website 6251 FOLLOWERS

Cloud Computing

Cloud Computing 6161 FOLLOWERS

App Development

App Development 6144 FOLLOWERS

Hardware and Software

Hardware and Software 6126 FOLLOWERS

IT Support

IT Support 6134 FOLLOWERS

Product Development

Product Development 6457 FOLLOWERS

Startup Branding and PR

Startup Branding and PR 6491 FOLLOWERS

First 100 Days

First 100 Days 6456 FOLLOWERS

Bootstrapping

Bootstrapping 6422 FOLLOWERS

Research and Innovation

Research and Innovation 6462 FOLLOWERS

Customer Retention

Customer Retention 7369 FOLLOWERS

Importing

Importing 7261 FOLLOWERS

Business Growth

Business Growth 7383 FOLLOWERS

Market Trend

Market Trend 7335 FOLLOWERS

Business Partnership

Business Partnership 7341 FOLLOWERS

Lifestyle and Health

Lifestyle and Health 7354 FOLLOWERS

Risk Management

Risk Management 7320 FOLLOWERS

Franchising

Franchising 7267 FOLLOWERS

Business Coaching

Business Coaching 7384 FOLLOWERS

Business Planning

Business Planning 7412 FOLLOWERS

New Business Ideas

New Business Ideas 6520 FOLLOWERS

View more